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CNR supports Linux Mint, adds Weatherbug

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Software

Linspire has upgraded its CNR.com (Click'N'Run) download site for Linux software to support the Ubuntu-based, consumer-friendly Linux Mint distribution. CNR.com will also add a Linux version of Weatherbug's weather service, which offers live, local weather information and severe weather alerts.

With the new Linux Mint support, says Linspire, CNR.com now supports five major Linux distros, including Freespire 2.0, Kubuntu 7.04 and 7.10, Ubuntu 7.04, 7.10, and 8.04 (32bit), and Linspire's own Linspire 6.0. To gain access to the free CNR Service, says the company, Linux Mint 4.0 users can install the free, recently upgraded CNR Client, available at CNR.com.

The new WeatherBug for Linux widgets are currently available for Freespire 2.0, Linspire 6.0, Linux Mint 4.0, and Ubuntu 7.04, 7.10, and 8.04 (32 bit) users, says Linspire. WeatherBug provides access to severe weather alerts, as well as local temperatures, wind speed, radar, and forecasts from WeatherBug's own international network of weather stations and cameras.

More Here




Also: Kevin Carmony: Pinheads and Patriots (Ubuntu Updates vs Linspire CNR, sorta)

re: Weatherbug

Great, so now linux users can enjoy the spyware/crapware/malware that Weatherbug provides, wahoo!

Use the Forecastfox plugin for Firefox - all the weather and none of the crap.

Wrong, no dice

vonskippy wrote:
Great, so now linux users can enjoy the spyware/crapware/malware that Weatherbug provides, wahoo!

Use the Forecastfox plugin for Firefox - all the weather and none of the crap.

This is pretty weak. First off, prove to me that it ever was spyware - because it never has been. Today's free Windows app is ad supported with embedded ads only, zero pop-ups, I run it myself.

As for preferring to be ad free, WeatherBug only offers like add-free alternatives like (WeatherBug Alert), which uses ZERO ADS in the app whatsoever. It's merely an alert that gives you severe weather warnings and link through your browser for more info.

I realize this is hard to come to terms with as the online echo chamber has been fun since the 1990's, but considering their business relationships with NOAA, Sprint, Verizon, Microsoft, countless schools and emergency management divisions on City, State and National levels, perhaps it is time to get the facts rather than continuing to follow the urban legends from companies who generate revenue from blacklisting companies for a dollar? Smile

Reality:

http://weather.weatherbug.com/aws-corporate/partners.asp
http://weather.weatherbug.com/weather-products.html
http://weather.weatherbug.com/labs.html

re: Wrong no dice

So either you work for Weatherbug, are a paid shill, or just plain stupid.

How about providing a few links that support Weatherbug from a NON-weatherbug site. I'm sure Microsoft has a few links on their site claiming they're not a monopoly.

Do a simple Google on "Weatherbug + Spyware" and then piss away your entire day reading thru article after article after article about the crapware known as Weatherbug.

Response

vonskippy wrote:
So either you work for Weatherbug, are a paid shill, or just plain stupid.

How about providing a few links that support Weatherbug from a NON-weatherbug site. I'm sure Microsoft has a few links on their site claiming they're not a monopoly.

Do a simple Google on "Weatherbug + Spyware" and then piss away your entire day reading thru article after article after article about the crapware known as Weatherbug.

vonskippy,

One distant commenter, obviously not a fan, reports the truth of how it all started:
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,10730032

This is in my opinion, why other ad-supported apps never ended up with the AdWare label while WB gained it for a very brief time.

So today, because that one WB app that has ads embedded, still has people pointing fingers at it, despite it never being a problem in the first place.

Reliable, brand name spyware detection tools will show you that WeatherBug is in fact, not spyware at all. While I am sure that there are some detection apps that need to keep database numbers high may still list it as a threat, in the end, anyone actually using the WB app will tell you that this is total hogwash. I, among a community of thousands, use it everyday safely on my Windows box.

---

Getting back to the Linux app, something I indeed had a hand beta testing and giving honest user input with it. WB for Linux is a highly configurable, simple to use, accurate application providing more control than any other weather app for Linux to date - period. While I cannot speak for WeatherBug the company, I can tell you from a personal perspective that this is NOT ad supported in any way.

So if you are not interested, more power to you. Perhaps you are not the best fit for the app, not a big deal. But please, do not spread FUD about something you apparently have been /deeply/ misinformed about. Nothing negative against you at all, I just want you to form an opinion that is not based on a buttload of blog entries surrounded by ads for the spyware removal industry. Smile

-----

As for supportive links...

About a year ago, WeatherBug answered the request for an app that ran on Windows, was free and had no ads at all. Yet strangely, no one talks about it....

It is called WeatherBug Alert, it uses your default browser to take you to the WB webpage when a user chooses to retrieve more info. Then entire app is a simple Applet sitting next the clock, there is nothing else embedded at all. No ads, nothing. It gives the user a temp and a means to get to the WB home page for their location.
http://www.download.com/WeatherBug-Alert/3000-2056_4-10718641.html

Quote from CNET: "Tested Spyware Free", btw.

And perhaps even more shocking from CNET...

http://www.download.com/WeatherBug/3000-2381_4-10407104.html

Also quoted from CNET: "Tested Spyware Free"

This is an now outdated version of WB, yet magically it tested spyware free - why? Because it is.
Yet as you can see from thoughtless comments, the rumors continue...it's sad, really. But if you dig far enough, the truth in the comments begin to surface.
http://www.download.com/WeatherBug/3640-2381_4-10407104.html?pn=2&sb=0&v=0

Despite the honest comments and constructive criticism, look at some of the other comments on CNET. Some of them are so ridiculous, they are difficult to read without snickering.

Quote: "This program came on my computer when I bought it in 2002. I deleted it as unnecessary, but now I want it again. Visiting the site gave me a virus, but luckily, Panda neutralized it. Very sad."

What the heck does that even mean? So they hate it, so then they want it, and the website - the one with no Java or ActiveX controls, has mysteriously infected them with a virus...riiightt. LOL.

Hopefully this sheds some light on what is actually going on.

Welcome to the Matrix, to a degree. Don't believe everything you read - triple check those claims by testing out the claims to ensure they are honestly reliable. The anti-spyware blogs are not as squeaky clean, as you might think.

eWeek+Linspire?

Non-event that CNR supports a simple derivative of Ubuntu, which contains some more binaries; And yet another application that is included in CNR.

As usual, the only site that pays attention to these non-announcements (press releases) from Linspire is DesktopLinux (eWeek), which makes one wonder about the relationships there. Is eWeek paid to publish these? The same goes for Xandros. It's only eWeek that always pays attention.

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