Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

ASUS Eee PC 900 (Linux)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

ASUS pioneered the low-cost laptop frontier with its Eee PC 701. This trailblazer, now competing against more polished competition such as HP’s Mini-Note, seeks to maintain its lead with the Eee PC 900. This $549 mini-notebook addresses its predecessor’s drawbacks by including a larger, higher-resolution 8.9-inch screen and more storage space.

We tested the Linux-based version, which comes with a 20GB solid state drive. (A Windows XP version of the 900 will also be available for $549 but it will sport a smaller 12GB SSD). Add in an improved 1.3-megapixel webcam and a multi-touch capable touchpad, and you have the makings of a successful, albeit more expensive sequel. If you can live with shorter battery life and a still-small keyboard, the Eee PC 900 is worth the extra dough.

Similar Design, Size, and Weight

Aesthetically, the Eee PC 900 isn’t noticeably different from the Eee PC 701 (or Eee PC 4G); the two look almost identical when sitting side by side. The systems, however, are more fraternal than identical twins: The Eee PC 900 is 0.2 inches longer than its brother and approximately 3.2 ounces heavier. Nevertheless, the system is still no bigger than most hardcover books, and carrying it around in a shoulder bag still left ample room for a wallet, keys, and cell phone. Under the lid we instantly noticed a few key differences. The screen is almost 2 inches larger (more on that below), the speakers that straddled it have been moved to the underside, and a silver plate surrounds the webcam.

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 4.16.3, 4.15.18 and 4.14.35

ExTiX 18.4 – “The Ultimate Linux System” – with LXQt 0.12.0, Refracta Tools, Calamares Installer and kernel 4.16.2-exton – Build 180419

I have made a new version of ExTiX – The Ultimate Linux System. I call it ExTiX 18.4 LXQt Live DVD. (The previous version was 17.8 from 171012). Read more

Migrating to Linux: Network and System Settings

Linux gives you a lot of control over network and system settings. On your desktop, Linux lets you tweak just about anything on the system. Most of these settings are exposed in plain text files under the /etc directory. Here I describe some of the most common settings you’ll use on your desktop Linux system. A lot of settings can be found in the Settings program, and the available options will vary by Linux distribution. Usually, you can change the background, tweak sound volume, connect to printers, set up displays, and more. While I won't talk about all of the settings here, you can certainly explore what's in there. Read more

Meet Bo, an Ubuntu-Powered Social Robot with AI Capabilities

Meet Bo, a social robot with AI (Artificial Intelligence) capabilities, powered by Canonical's Ubuntu Linux operating system and optimized to welcome customers, as well as to help them navigate to find products and areas in your organization. Bo was already used by several well-known brands like Etisalat and BT in a bunch of scenarios, including hospitality and retail scenarios, and it's being tested in large shopping centers in the United Kingdom, such as Lakeside. Read more