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OpenApp sets sights on Irish Open Source

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Open Applications Consulting, known as one the best companies pioneering the open source movement in Ireland, is to sponsor the Irish Open Source Technology Conference in June.

The company more commonly known as OpenApp, was one of the first organisations in Ireland to parent the open source culture to its business and has received numerous accolades including An Taoiseach's 'Irish Public Service Excellence Award 2008' for their Health Atlas Ireland system, developed as part of the PloneGov project, an international e-government initiative.

Speaking at the announcement, Mel McIntyre, Managing Director of OpenApp said "We've built our business through support of OSS technologies and solutions for business users in Ireland and are interested in furthering the awareness of OSS and the considerable benefits of utilising them."

Mel explains that Open Source Software can yield economic, intellectual, social and technical benefits to Ireland; economic through lowering license costs and giving a viable alternative to proprietary offerings ; intellectual freedom from corporate dominated standards; and social through the encouragement and structuring of collaborative networks; and technology benefits through access to world leaders

Barry Alistair, Commercial Director of IrishDev.com the organisers of IOTC 2008 said "The IOTC is a community event for the open source community and we were keen to involve an indigenous 'grass roots' company. OpenApp credentials speak for themselves - they were founding members of OpenIreland, who are co-organising IOTC, of Zope Europe Association and partners to the Open Forum. Mel McIntyre is arguably one of the earliest and most active adopters championing the open source cause in Ireland. He has devoted considerable personal time as Open Ireland Chairperson and is also a director of OpenForum Europe. "

He continued "Whilst it's clear OpenApp 'the brand' and Mel McIntyre 'the person' demonstrate their commitment to open source, it is also very much so of OpenApp the 'team'. Con Hennessy is a long time contributor to ILUG (also co-organisers of the IOTC) and the OpenOffice.org project, Michael Kerrin is an active contributor to Zope and Python projects, including the Python Ireland (another co-organiser of the IOTC) and Rory McCann is active with Camara, the Irish NGO bringing computing to African schools.

OpenApp have remained consistent on its focus on developing and integrating application using Open Source technologies.

Development Director, Con Hennessy said "From an applications point of view, we mainly develop in Python on Zope and have recently developed quite a number of Plone based systems including the Health Atlas Ireland. We also provide support for IT infrastructure such as Linux Thin Clients, Linux Servers, XEN virtualisation, Email and Groupware.

Barry Alistair concluded "It is clear that within this organisation, exists a team that eats, breathes and sleeps its belief in open source software principles. It is rare to see such a commitment at this level within one company and we're really pleased OpenApp has decided to sponsor the conference.

Readers might be interested to know that the IOTC is going to be streamed live on the IOTC website on the 19th and 20th of June. To receive progress updates for IOTC 2008 and to be in with a chance to win complimentary tickets, email IOTC@IrishDev.com or follow us on Twitter.com/IOTC2008

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