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Red Hat Fedora and Enterprise Linux 4 Bible

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I was recently looking to upgrade a laptop to Fedora Core 4, which happened to happen at roughly the time I got a copy of Red Hat Fedora and Enterprise Linux 4 Bible by noted technology author Christopher Negus. During a quick scan I ran into a section that I think many Linux users, Fedora or otherwise, might fine useful, Chapter 9, using the "Internet and the Web," which despite the chapter heading delves into things many new Linux users might find interesting particularly "Remote Login Copy and Execution," which was excerpted in Volume 3, Issue 8 of LinuxWorld Magazine.

Another fortuitous turn was the Fedora Core 4 on DVD, which made it one of my first Linux upgrades that didn't require a number of CDs burned from ISOs downloaded from ftp sites or Bit Torrent. Negus' book is a continuation of an anthology that started in 1999 with the Red Hat Linux Bible. The latest edition has been refined, polished and covers both Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux products.

The value of this book is that it's a comprehensive resource for a user new to Linux complete with the installation media of Fedora Core 4 and a bootable Knoppix Linux distribution.

Full Review.

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