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Promise of cost-savings drives take-up of Linux

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Listening to Amy Niersbach talk about the deployment of open source software in local government systems in Chicago it is not hard to see why the spread of open source has been one of the biggest technology trends in recent years.

“We save a heap of money,” says the platform architect for the City of Chicago. “On hardware, licensing, operating costs – and performance is good.”

The Windy City is turning to open source – in this case Red Hat’s Linux operating system – to replace expensive proprietary programs, so freeing money to spend in other areas.

It is not just the cash-strapped public sector that sees benefits from open source.

In the business world, CIOs are increasingly concerned about price rises, unnecessary features and the seemingly built-in obsolescence of proprietary software which forces them to upgrade according to a schedule set by the vendor.

In response, many organisations are taking a closer look at open source software as a cheaper and restriction-free alternative to conventional proprietary programs.

Full Story.

Elsewhere on FT: Demand for IP telephony based on open source software will generate more business over the next few years than the entire Linux marketplace, predicts Jon “Maddog” Hall, president of Linux International. Rampant growth predicted as larger enterprises show interest.

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So basically Bradley Kuhn gave a talk at FOSDEM '17 about GPL enforcement and I was like, wow, it sucks how many companies and people think that enforcing the GPL is a bad idea. I mean, if you disagree with copyleft that's fine (though I personally would argue with that position), but then you should use a suitable license. Like MIT. The very idea that we shouldn't enforce the GPL just doesn't make sense to me because it suggests that the text of the license is watery and unimportant. I don't know about you, but when I say I want my programs to respect users' freedom, I mean it. So GPL enforcement is important. It seemed to me that there are probably a lot of developers out there who want to support GPL enforcement but don't have a good way to voice that support. gplenforced.org is essentially a quick and dirty hack I wrote to make that dead-simple. Read more

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