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KDE user's look at Gnome-2.10

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I guess it's no secret that I'm a KDE user. But every once in a while I like to login to others to see what's new. As such, this will be a newbie's look at gnome.

My first hurdle was getting into gnome. I usually start kde with a startx referencing my ~/.xinitrc file with the entry of the latest startkde. So, I exited kde, loaded the new nvidia drivers, and preceded to scratch my head. I which'd for a startgnome binary...hmmm, no luck. I locate'd a gnomestart, again, the big nothing. Then I remembered gnome comes with a graphical login thing kinda like kdm, so I typed gdm as root. Ahhh, there we go. I chose gnome as the session and logged in.

I preceded to look around in the menus and start customizing a tad. I set a wallpaper and customized my terminal. After the two most important details finished, I could now see some of the included applications.

Well, seems gnome comes with some nice games to waste time when I should be working. There are a few applications for using the internet such as gaim, nmap, and evolution. Setting up evolution was a breeze, it comes with a nice little wizard. There's nvu in the menu for web development. What is the configuration editor? There's a system monitor, screensaver configuration and a file browser. Yikes! All stuff I left on kde desktop popped up as soon as I opened the file manager. I wasn't expecting that. What an embarrassingly messy desktop. Well, I'da cleaned up if I'da known I was gonna have company. The multimedia menu is a little sparse and the cd player crashed as soon as it was opened. Hey, a theme manager, alriiight. Now that's better. Also included are some other tweaking applications such as screen resolution config, sessions manager, and sound server config.

All in all this seems like a desktop environment/window manager I could use. I like fluxbox quite a bit and gnome seems like it's a little easier to customize in that there are some graphical configurations available. It seems extremely snappy and responsive. Gnome has certainly made great strides since my last look around and I know I'll be coming back to it from time to time. If you are gnome fan, I imagine you'll appreciate the improvements such as a much ligher and more responsive feel in general. The default fonts are gorgeous and the included themes are nice.

This is just a beta ebuild from gentoo, so the few crashes I experienced may or may not be attributed to gnome exclusively. The main applications seem stable and responsive.

If you haven't explored gnome in a while or have never given it a look-see, it might be worth your while to log in. I'm glad I installed and looked around. I bet I'll be back.

Oh and of course, screenshots.

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