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Eclipse Expert Revisits Ireland

Shaun Smith, a lead developer in the Java Platform Group in Oracle and Eco-System Development lead for EclipseLink, the Eclipse Persistence Services Project, is to return to Ireland in June to present at the Irish Open Source Technology Conference.

Shaun, who lives in Ontario, Canada, is a regular feature speaker at global events like EclipseCon, Eclipse Forum Europe, JAX, JavaPolis (now called Javoxx), plus numerous other seminars, first presented with IrishDev.com at the Irish Java Technology Conference Irish Java Technology Conference last November.

Responsible for delivering Oracle's Java EE server that powers Oracle Fusion Middleware, Shaun and his team develop Oracle’s TopLink which provides implementations of Java persistence standards like Java Persistence API (JPA), Java Architecture for XML (JAXB) and Service Data Objects (SDO).
Oracle is leading EclipseLink and will include it in an upcoming release of Fusion Middleware and so has a vested interest in EclipseLink having a vibrant healthy community.

Shaun explained that Open source is a force in the software development market that can't be ignored and it's amazingly global. In March of 2007, TopLink was open sourced at EclipseCon in the Eclipse Persistence Services Project (EclipseLink). Since then, the TopLink team are working 100% on open source software development and through open source involvement he has been able to collaborate with people from many countries and seen software effortless cross national boundaries. To emphasize this point he continued that software that is being written presently is bound for an application server in South Korea. A company there is building a commercial product based on open source developed half way around the world – he concludes geography isn't an issue anymore.

Barry Alistair of IrishDev.com, IrishDev.com event organizers of the Irish Open Source Technology Conference said “Shaun is truly a gifted technologist and presenter. His session at the Irish Java Technology Conference - Building Applications with Eclipse and Dali - went down a storm. It was one of the busiest presentations of the conference. Not only is he a great technologist, he will, no doubt impart great knowledge to the open source community who attend the IOTC or log on to watch it live. Shaun is also very approachable and will make a great draw to people who want to meet him personally.
Shaun commented “In my role as Eco-System Development lead for EclipseLink, I'm interested in getting the word out about EclipseLink and building our community of users, contributors, and committers. I was really pleased to be invited back to Ireland to join the The Irish Open Source Technology Conference because it’s an opportunity to meet Java developers who have to interact with data (and who doesn't) and introduce them to EclipseLink and our community at Eclipse.

Readers might be interested to know that the IOTC is going to be streamed live on the IOTC website IOTC Website on the 19th and 20th of June - keep abreast via RSS RSS follow us on Twitter.com/IOTC2008 Twitter.com/IOTC2008, Facebook or please send an event alert request to IOTC2008@IrishDev.com and we'll be happy to send a reminder, weekly updates and even chances to win complimentary tickets.

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