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GUI vs. Command Line, similiarity in tools

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My first long-term job was Unix programming.

Thats way I prefer the command line tools.

I think GUI does not have real performance in tasks of programmer, also GUI skills can not be reused when you need automate your task you done before by clicking.

If you typed instead, you can put your typing in the script and make the script working for any count of times.

However I found in my practice some cases when GUI was better than command line for development.

1) Development of GUI
I have experience of the development of tools for the internet trading, that were mouse based and highly interactive. And visual tools for visual development were really much progress in comparison to writing code for forms definition. In such RAD tools for the GUI, GUI interface and the visual development environment is the must.

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