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Vista selling well!?

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Microsoft

Whatever drugs Steve Ballmer is on they must be very, very good. That's the only explanation I can come up with for Ballmer telling the Australian press that he's "amazing pleased" with Vista sales.

Unlike arguing the virtues of XP vs. Vista, or, as has increasing become the discussion, Linux vs. Mac OS vs. Vista vs. XP, where personal preferences comes into play, no CEO could possibly be happy with their main product's sales if it were Vista.

Here are the cold hard facts. Microsoft reported on March 25th that its Windows sales had dropped 24% in the last quarter. For the same quarter, IDC said PC sales were up 15%. Now, I'm no financial wizard, but I do know a thing or two. Microsoft's Windows sales, to the best of my knowledge, have just suffered their hardest fall ever at the same time that PC sales were significantly up. This isn't just bad, this is absolutely horrible.

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PCs selling well!?

Buy computer, be forced to get something you'll remove anyway. Some months ago less than 1% of businesses adopted Vista. Sold, not deployed.

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