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Tricky steps for open source Mambo

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OSS

Open source software is a wonderful concept. The community at large is free to adopt and enhance an application. The fortunes of that application are determined by the interest and dedication of its developers, be they large organisations or committed individuals. If there is insufficient interest then that project loses momentum and is overtaken by others.

Periodically, though, questions surface about the direction and control of the roadmap for a project. Often everyone agrees on the answers, but sometimes not, and a fork in the development occurs. This inevitably leads to a divergence of interests and wasted effort. In time the forks might evolve into entirely different applications, but if they do not then we all lose out to the "mine is better than yours" arguments.

Unfortunately a fork may be looming in the development of Mambo. Miro has set up the Mambo Foundation, which has the task of controlling the roadmap for Mambo. To be a strategic member with a real say in the project's future you have to pay membership fees of AUS$50,000 (£21,000) per annum.

Full Story.

Whew

Probably feeling pretty good about your decision to use Drupal instead eh?

re: Whew

teehee! I hear ya!

I actually looked at Mambo, but I didn't really like it's "look".

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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