Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Tricky steps for open source Mambo

Filed under
OSS

Open source software is a wonderful concept. The community at large is free to adopt and enhance an application. The fortunes of that application are determined by the interest and dedication of its developers, be they large organisations or committed individuals. If there is insufficient interest then that project loses momentum and is overtaken by others.

Periodically, though, questions surface about the direction and control of the roadmap for a project. Often everyone agrees on the answers, but sometimes not, and a fork in the development occurs. This inevitably leads to a divergence of interests and wasted effort. In time the forks might evolve into entirely different applications, but if they do not then we all lose out to the "mine is better than yours" arguments.

Unfortunately a fork may be looming in the development of Mambo. Miro has set up the Mambo Foundation, which has the task of controlling the roadmap for Mambo. To be a strategic member with a real say in the project's future you have to pay membership fees of AUS$50,000 (£21,000) per annum.

Full Story.

Whew

Probably feeling pretty good about your decision to use Drupal instead eh?

re: Whew

teehee! I hear ya!

I actually looked at Mambo, but I didn't really like it's "look".

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews AJ Jordon of gplenforced.org

So basically Bradley Kuhn gave a talk at FOSDEM '17 about GPL enforcement and I was like, wow, it sucks how many companies and people think that enforcing the GPL is a bad idea. I mean, if you disagree with copyleft that's fine (though I personally would argue with that position), but then you should use a suitable license. Like MIT. The very idea that we shouldn't enforce the GPL just doesn't make sense to me because it suggests that the text of the license is watery and unimportant. I don't know about you, but when I say I want my programs to respect users' freedom, I mean it. So GPL enforcement is important. It seemed to me that there are probably a lot of developers out there who want to support GPL enforcement but don't have a good way to voice that support. gplenforced.org is essentially a quick and dirty hack I wrote to make that dead-simple. Read more

Red Hat General and Financial News

today's howtos