Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Tinkering of Brazil

Eoin Brazil, a Computer Systems graduate from the University of Limerick (BSc in 2000 and MSc in 2003), is now a Research Officer working on auditory displays and on the use of sound in human-computer interaction in the university's Interaction Design Centre.

His research interests cover Computer Science, Interaction Design, Electronics, Sound, and Multimedia. He is an Irish Delegate to the European COST Action IC0601 on Sonic Interaction Design and is finishing his doctoral research in this area.

At Irish Open Source Technology Conference, he will explain why 'The Arduino' platform is an ideal learning environment for those new to electronics, such as artists or designer, wishing to learn and create hardware projects, whilst at the same time still offers so much to experienced software programmers wishing to use this approach to develop their own projects.

'The Arduino' is a fully open source and extendable programming environment (IDE) running on cross-platforms - Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. It simplifies many of the previous difficulties encountered with programming microcontrollers.

Eoin believes open source has vastly reduced the cost and complexity of and has brought the programming of microcontrollers out of the hands of electronic or computer engineers and into the hands of electronic amateurs who wish to hack and tinker. Costing about $50 Arduino, certainly is very cheap.

Talking at the announcement of his IOTC engagement, Brazil continues "I want to introduce the audience to the possibilities and functionality of the Arduino and I hope by the end of my talk people will have the knowledge and basics to start to develop their own homebrew ideas using this cheap open source platform."

Barry Alistair, MD of and chair of the Irish Open Source Technology Conference said "Whilst the government's strategy for transforming Ireland to a knowledge economy is crucial to the country, the visibility of these projects is also paramount in encouraging second level students to choose the industry for their careers. It will be interesting to see how open source is impacting research projects, and since the University of Limerick is the birth place of, it is particularly special to have Eoin join us to share his work."

Readers might be interested to know that the IOTC is going to be streamed live on the IOTC Website on the 19th and 20th of June - keep abreast via RSS follow us on, Facebook or please send an event alert request to and we'll be happy to send a reminder, weekly updates and even chances to win complimentary tickets.

More in Tux Machines

Intel Cache Allocation Technology / RDT Still Baking For Linux

Not mentioned in my earlier features you won't find in the Linux 4.9 mainline kernel is support for Intel's Cache Allocation Technology (CAT) but at least it was revised this weekend in still working towards mainline integration. Read more Also: Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

Linux Kernel News

Games for GNU/Linux