Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Tinkering of Brazil

Eoin Brazil, a Computer Systems graduate from the University of Limerick (BSc in 2000 and MSc in 2003), is now a Research Officer working on auditory displays and on the use of sound in human-computer interaction in the university's Interaction Design Centre.

His research interests cover Computer Science, Interaction Design, Electronics, Sound, and Multimedia. He is an Irish Delegate to the European COST Action IC0601 on Sonic Interaction Design and is finishing his doctoral research in this area.

At Irish Open Source Technology Conference, he will explain why 'The Arduino' platform is an ideal learning environment for those new to electronics, such as artists or designer, wishing to learn and create hardware projects, whilst at the same time still offers so much to experienced software programmers wishing to use this approach to develop their own projects.

'The Arduino' is a fully open source and extendable programming environment (IDE) running on cross-platforms - Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. It simplifies many of the previous difficulties encountered with programming microcontrollers.

Eoin believes open source has vastly reduced the cost and complexity of and has brought the programming of microcontrollers out of the hands of electronic or computer engineers and into the hands of electronic amateurs who wish to hack and tinker. Costing about $50 Arduino, certainly is very cheap.

Talking at the announcement of his IOTC engagement, Brazil continues "I want to introduce the audience to the possibilities and functionality of the Arduino and I hope by the end of my talk people will have the knowledge and basics to start to develop their own homebrew ideas using this cheap open source platform."

Barry Alistair, MD of IrishDev.com and chair of the Irish Open Source Technology Conference said "Whilst the government's strategy for transforming Ireland to a knowledge economy is crucial to the country, the visibility of these projects is also paramount in encouraging second level students to choose the industry for their careers. It will be interesting to see how open source is impacting research projects, and since the University of Limerick is the birth place of IrishDev.com, it is particularly special to have Eoin join us to share his work."

Readers might be interested to know that the IOTC is going to be streamed live on the IOTC Website on the 19th and 20th of June - keep abreast via RSS follow us on Twitter.com/IOTC2008, Facebook or please send an event alert request to IOTC2008@IrishDev.com and we'll be happy to send a reminder, weekly updates and even chances to win complimentary tickets.

More in Tux Machines

Debian and Derivatives

  • Glad to be a Mentor of Google Summer Code again!
    While, why I proposed this idea? Plinth is developed by Freedombox which is a Debian based project. The Freedombox is aiming for building a 100% free software self-hosting web server to deploy social applications on small machines. It provides online communication tools respecting user privacy and data ownership, replacing services provided by third-parties that under surveillance. Plinth is the front-end of Freedombox, written in Python.
  • The #newinstretch game: new forensic packages in Debian/stretch
    Debian/stretch AKA Debian 9.0 will include a bunch of packages for people interested in digital forensics. The packages maintained within the Debian Forensics team which are new in the Debian/stretch release as compared to Debian/jessie (and ignoring jessie-backports):
  • Getting ready for Stretch
    I run about 17 servers. Of those about six are very personal and the rest are a small cluster which are used for a single website. (Partly because the code is old and in some ways a bit badly designed, partly because "clustering!", "high availability!", "learning!", "fun!" - seriously I had a lot of fun putting together a fault-tolerant deployment with haproxy, ucarp, etc, etc. If I were paying for it the site would be both retired and static!)
  • Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 stable release (LTS)
    Once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you! Many of you might remember November 2014 when we announced that we were going to fork Debian. Well, we have done exactly that. It has been a long process, but now over two years later, we proudly present Devuan Jessie 1.0.0 Stable.
  • Parsix GNU/Linux Is Closing Its Doors, All Users Will Be Migrated to Debian 9
    You know we hate to give you guys bad news, but it looks like the Parsix GNU/Linux project is closing its doors in about six months after the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

OSS Leftovers

Ubuntu-Based Alternatives and Snapcraft 2.30

  • ​How to install Linux Mint on your Windows PC
    I think Linux Mint isn't just a great desktop, it's a great replacement for Windows. With Windows security problems such as WannaCry, people are starting to explore alternatives to Windows. I got a number of requests about switching out from Windows to the latest and best Linux. For me and many other experienced Linux users that's Linux Mint 18.1. You don't need to be a Linux expert to install Mint on a Windows PC. Here's how to do it.
  • Distro watch for Ubuntu lovers: What's ahead in Linux land
    With the death of Unity, Canonical will focus more attention on Ubuntu servers, Ubuntu in the cloud and Ubuntu in the so-called Internet of Things. Even if you give Canonical the benefit of the doubt - that it will continue working on desktop Ubuntu - at the very least, desktop Ubuntu's future looks uncertain. Post Unity, how will the transition to GNOME work? Will existing Unity users be "upgraded" to GNOME with 17.10? Canonical is reportedly plotting out solutions to much of this uncertainty right now, but for users, the uncertainty rules the day.
  • Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.30 Snappy Packaging Tool for Ubuntu Linux OSes
    Canonical's Sergio Schvezov was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of Snapcraft 2.30, a major milestone of the open-source Snappy packaging tool used to package apps in the Snap universal binary format.

An introduction to Linux's EXT4 filesystem

Although written for Linux, the EXT filesystem has its roots in the Minix operating system and the Minix filesystem, which predate Linux by about five years, being first released in 1987. Understanding the EXT4 filesystem is much easier if we look at the history and technical evolution of the EXT filesystem family from its Minix roots. Read more