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Microsoft’s deceptive advertising, again.

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS




Fort 25

Why on earth does Asay advertise Microsoft's attempt to steal projects from Linux (to Windows)?

Now Hiring - Astroturfer, apply at Microsoft

I imagine for the same reason as Penguin Pete, Asay just can't be as direct.

Quote:

Evidently, a "Senior Marketing Manager" has the responsibility of:

  • "assisting in defining and driving core marketing initiatives – most specifically online & offline community-building"

  • "further the dialogue on the value of the Microsoft platform to open source audiences"
  • "be a cornerstone for a global thought leadership website and will be regularly featured in industry press around the world"
  • "act as a visible external evangelist for Microsoft"

Wow! That's all direct quotes from the job description. It is so blatant, I'm beginning to wonder if it's some kind of joke. Particularly the 'evangelist' line.

More Here

Keep Your Eyes Open

One of the unexpected benefits of Microsoft's desire to get some hot openness-juice is that in its effort to appear open it is revealing far more of its internal thought processes. Here's a fascinating document coming out of that – actually a job advertisement for the post of Senior Marketing Manager – Open Source Community.

Let's just look at that a little.

The new marketing manager will “drive customer-ready evidence to arm customers and partners with the benefits of Microsoft platforms and open source stacks.” This seems to me the heart of what's going on here, particularly the tell-tale phrase “the benefits of Microsoft platforms and open source stacks.” Translated, this means open source enterprise apps running on Windows.

So, let's see, who's the loser here? Oh, look, it's GNU/Linux:

Rest Here

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