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Linux filesystem defragmentation flame war

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Earlier this week I’ve read this article: “Defragmentation of Linux Filesystems“. The title and the headline made me interested enough, to go ahead and read it and see if there was something there to show me that linux filesystems do need defragmentation. The result was that I was not convinced at all, and on a quick check on some of my most used systems I could not see any defragmentation issues.

Still the reason for this post is not a technical one, but a human one.

If I had a useful addition to the post I could have added my opinion. But what if I didn’t had anything useful to add? and nothing to do… Should I start an injury comment and crush the author? Who would benefit from this? This is what I am trying to respond in this post… just check out the comments and you will see what i mean.

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