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Full-On (line) Speakers List Announced for IOTC 2008

The Irish Open Source Technology Conference has today announced its speaker line-up for the event June 19th - 20th.

The committee of the Irish Open Source Technology Conference, representatives of www.IrishDev.com (the organisers), The Irish Linux User Group,, Python Ireland User Group,, Dublin Java User Group,, Irish PHP User Group, Ruby Ireland User Group and Open Ireland, the association dedicated to promoting open source to businesses in Ireland, have selected an impressive line-up of international people (United States, Canada, England, Poland, Wales and Ireland) to speak at the event.
Barry Alistair of IrishDev.com commended the committee "the members of the IOTC committee have attracted a great line-up for the Irish tech community, and I believe we'll have a full house in Dublin's CineWorld complex between the 18th and 20th June."

He continued, "We are filming and streaming the IOTC sessions live on our website (http://iotc.firstport.ie) to open up access to people who live abroad or simply cannot make it to Dublin for the event - of course, the online interaction does not afford the same benefits as being in the same room as the speakers and other delegates, but at least people need not miss a minute."

The speakers are as follows…

Open Source Business
Shane Coughlan / Free and Open Software Foundation
Colm MacCarthaigh / Joost.com
Graham Taylor / The Open Forum Europe
Adam Jollans / IBM Ireland

Open Source Development
Geoffrey Grosenbach / Top Funky - Ruby Plugin Patterns
Shaun Smith / Oracle - EclipseLink
Clint Oram / Sugar CRM -
Colin Rooney / Adempiere Project
Patrick Collison / Auctomatic - LISP & Smalltalk
Bryn M.Reeves / Red Hat
Stephen McGibbon / Microsoft - Open XML
Kevin Noonan / Calbane - WURFL
Adam Gzella / DERI - Corrib.org
Con Hennessy / Open App - Python on Zope
Tim Bunce - Perl
David Coallier / Irish PHP User Group - PHP
Aileen Cunningham / IONA Technologies –

Open Source IT Pro / Hardware
Brian Nitz / Sun Microsystems - Open Solaris
Eoin Brazil / UL - Arduino
Alan Roberts & Alan Guinane / AIB - One of, if not 'the' biggest deployment of desktop Linux in Europe.
Adrian Bowyer / RepRap
Paul Lynch / Hosting 365 - Cloud Computing for Large Linux Deployment

WHEN
The event, starting with an informal launch evening on Wednesday 18th June, will run through Thursday and Friday the 19th and 20th.

PRICE
Tickets (bought online) for entry cost €189.00 for two days (includes Wednesday), or €129.00 for a one day pass.

There is a special entry price for FULL TIME students - €50.00 for two day pass, or €30.00 for the one day.

For people who cannot attend, log on to the Irish Open Source Technology Conference website to see the LIVE coverage of the event.

Keep abreast via RSS follow us on Twitter.com/IOTC2008, Facebook or please send an event alert request to IOTC2008@IrishDev.com and we'll be happy to send a reminder, weekly updates and even chances to win complimentary tickets.

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