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Hot kNew Stuff

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ca asked why this interview with Josef Spillner wasn't on some of the biggie news sites, so I thought I'd share it on my teny tiny one.

"There has been some recent buzz around KDE's Get Hot New Stuff framework. As the first in a series looking into KDE technologies, KDE Dot News interviewed author Josef Spillner to find out what all this "stuff" was about... read on for the interview. You may also be interested in recent blog entries about KNewStuff: Kate, desktop backgrounds, Quanta, KNewStuffSecure, its user interface design and the HotStuff server setup."

"Hi, I'm Josef Spillner, a computer sciences student from Dresden in Germany. About 6 years ago I saw KDE for the first time, and some months afterwards the first application written by myself appeared on my desktop."

"The GHNS concept describes a way to let users share their digital creations. For example, user A is using a spreadsheet application and modifies a template which comes with it. This template can then be uploaded to a server, and eventually be downloaded by user B by checking the contents of the "Get Hot New Stuff" download dialogue. In the context of companies, documents can be distributed to all employees, and in the context of the internet, a community sharing framework is built on top of all this.

The KNewStuff library is the KDE implementation for checking which file providers support the requested data type, and which files are available, including their version, popularity and preview information. Files can be up- and downloaded, digitally signed, uncompressed on the fly and more."

Full Interview.

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