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Openoffice.org mailing labels solution

My daughter is getting married this Summer, and she purchased some weird Avery return address labels for invitees to RSVP whether they plan to attend. The labels have an Avery number of 18195. I have no MS-Windows workstations at home, and I couldn't find an Openoffice.org Writer template for this particular label stock. What to do?

The labels are 2/3 inch tall, 1 3/4" wide, 4 across in a row, and 15 rows on an 8 1/2" by 11" (US letter size) sheet. I still can't find a corresponding OOoWriter template. Nothing even close.

I do a Google search, and try glabel. It seems very powerful--alas, after fooling around with it for a few minutes, I'm not able to get very close to what I need for a label format.

Then, I go to Avery's web site, and download Avery's Microsoft Word doc file template for the 19195 labels. I then open it into Openoffice.org 3.0 Writer beta (m-17). The doc file is a table. I type the return address into one cell, copy that address, and quickly paste the address info into the other 59 cells. I try a print-out on a plain piece of paper and then I examine the printed registration match-up with the Avery label stock. No joy, the table rows on the test print-out aren't tall enough.

In Writer, I select the entire table, pull up the row height option, and see that the doc file import had set the row height to .60 inches instead of the needed .67 inches (or possibly, Avery had it incorrect in the original doc file). I change the row height accordingly, print-out another plain paper copy, and check the registration again. Everything lines up. A minute later, and all my labels are perfectly printed.

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