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Thanks TuxMachines!

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Hello TuxMachines,
I just wanted to thank this site and its keepers for the excellent Linux news it provides for its users every day. I browse through the new links here daily, and TuxMachines has become my #1 source for interesting news and cool new/ old sites.
As a blogger myself (Just Another Tech Blog), who has been linked to by this site a few times, I'd also like to extend thanks for the many new visitors that my site received from your mention (as I am sure many other sites have also).

A have donated a bit to this site, as just a token of my gratitude for all that TuxMachines does the for the Linux community. It isn't much (sorry... unemployed teen here), but I hope that it helps a little. Maybe my clicks on your ads will make a little difference too...

Anyways,

Thanks again! Smile

Best of luck to this site and its maintainers!

-linnerd40

Idem Dito

This is my favorite linux related site.

I also get some traffic every now and then from this site, so that's makes it even better.

Keep up the good work guys.

Same here

Same here. I received a lot of support from TuxMachines, they published the articles on my blog very often, without even submitting any. Keep up this great work!

I wish I could do more I

I wish I could do more Sad
I really love this site. Thanks a million for having it up!

-linnerd40

re: thank you

Oh that was you? Thank you for the kind words, clicks, and the donation. I appreciate it. I put a lot of time and effort into this site, so it's appreciated when someone says something nice.

Thanks again.

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