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5 Awesome Linux Apps

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Software

Well, a lot of time has passed since my little article about the ten apps I immediately install onto a default Linux setup. And time in open source means evolution! I’ve switched to a few apps that really make my desktop experience more enjoyable because of speed, stability and beauty.

Let’s see what we got…

Banshee

I’ve always been an Amarok fanboy, then I switched to GTK+ and with it to Audacious. But it has never been the same. Banshee, which is now at version 1.0, has everything you need, and MORE. Podcasts, Internet radio, album artwork, it’s just liek Amarok, only in my opinion, better, prettier and simply the best player for GNOME out there. It has integrated iPod support too. Rhythmbox is just nothing compared to Banshee.

Opera

More Here




Starting with Mono and proprietary software...

At least the latter 3 are good. Smile

This is FREE software, you ****head!

Stop polluting this good website.

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