Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

NVIDIA GeForce 8200

Filed under
Hardware

Back in March we had looked at the Radeon HD 3200 graphics found on AMD 780G motherboards. With the Catalyst Linux driver the Radeon HD 3200 had performed about the same speed as the discrete Radeon HD 2400PRO graphics card, which we were quite pleased with considering its integrated and low-power design. The Radeon HD 3200 also offers support for DisplayPort and HDMI, but it's up to the motherboard vendor which output connections they wish to utilize. The Radeon HD 3200 / 780G certainly impressed us, but today we are looking at NVIDIA's latest IGP offering for AMD's Phenom platform. While not all of these features are available to Linux customers, the GeForce 8200 supports DirectX 10, PureVideo HD, GeForce Boost, Hybrid SLI, and other leading edge features. Though between the Radeon HD 3200 and GeForce 8200, which IGP offering reigns supreme under Linux? In this article we'll tell you our thoughts.

NVIDIA's GeForce 8 IGP line-up consists of the 8100, 8200, and 8300 series. However, these chipsets are only available for AMD's platform and at present the latest for use with Intel processors are left with the GeForce 7 IGPs. Some of the additions made to the GeForce 8200 compared to the earlier GeForce 7050 include AM2+ compatibility for allowing Quad-Core Phenom processors, GeForce Boost, HybridPower Technology, PureVideo HD, and DirectX 10. Outside of the graphics realm, this motherboard chipset now supports six Serial ATA 2.0 ports, compared to four with earlier models. Unfortunately for Linux users, HybridPower and PureVideo HD are both off the table right now with NVIDIA not intending to support either technology via their proprietary driver. The display options include HDMI, DVI, and VGA, but there is no support for DisplayPort.

More here




More in Tux Machines

Tiny, stackable, Linux-based IoT module hits Kickstarter

On Kickstarter, Onion launched a tiny, Linux-based “Omega” IoT module, along with a dock, stackable expansion modules, a cloud service, and web app tools. Onion’s Omega joins a growing number of single board computers and computer-on-modules for Internet of Things applications that have tapped Qualcomm’s MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Atheros AR9331 system-on-chip. For a pledge of $25, Onion’s Kickstarter campaign offers the Omega computer-on-module combined with a “dock” that turns it into an sandwich-style single board computer. Read more

Development activity in LibreOffice and OpenOffice

The LibreOffice project was announced with great fanfare in September 2010. Nearly one year later, the OpenOffice.org project (from which LibreOffice was forked) was cut loose from Oracle and found a new home as an Apache project. It is fair to say that the rivalry between the two projects in the time since then has been strong. Predictions that one project or the other would fail have not been borne out, but that does not mean that the two projects are equally successful. A look at the two projects' development communities reveals some interesting differences. Read more

11 Ways That Linux Contributes to Tech Innovation

Over the past six months I've asked new Linux Foundation corporate members on the cutting edge of technology to weigh in on what interesting or innovative trends they're witnessing and the role that Linux plays in them. Here's what engineers, CTOs, and other business leaders from companies including CoreOS, Rackspace, SanDisk, and more had to say. Read more