Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

ZFS on Linux: my story and HOWTO you can have it too

Filed under
Software

Have you heard about ZFS? It’s a generation-defining stable high-performance high-end filesystems, created by Jeff Bonwick at Sun, and ported over to Mac OS X and the BSD family. Oh, and for Linux, using the FUSE (Filesystem in userspace) kernel abstraction. Here’s my ZFS story.

I’m using Kubuntu Hardy, and my computer has two 400 GB SATA hard disks. Yes, that’s all the storage I have at hand; as of three days ago, it was RAIDed using the multipath devices (md) kernel module, split in two LVM volumes: /and /home. Oh, and two same-size byte-aligned swap partitions, one on each disk, swapon‘ed pri=0.

I had been salivating over the thought of using ZFS in my workstation because of several killer features:

* The first one that comes to mind is end-to-end data integrity thanks to checksumming — I’ve already had many disks go bad on me, while others corrupted my data silently (which is, believe it or not, the most insidious thing ever, because after you’ve noticed it, backups won’t help you with that — you’ve probably already papered over your backups with new, bad data).

* The second one is compression. Together with tightly packed data, compression promises to increase performance and reduce disk utilization.

* The third one is the advanced transactional algorithm that yields an always-consistent disk structure. Unlike log-based filesystems, ZFS does copy-on-write and ripples the changes up through the filesystem tree; before the topmost node is updated, the changes don’t affect consistency; when the topmost node is updated, the disk is consistent as well. Never fsck again!

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Fedora 23 EOL, Bye to FBDEV, Installfests of Yore

With Fedora 25 safely out of the door, time has come to bid adieu to version 23. Users are urged to upgrade. Elsewhere, Robin Miller looked back at an activity that older Linux users may remember, the Linux installfest. Michael Larabel reported today that the kernel may drop framebuffer device drivers and Dustin Kirkland shared Ubuntu's security overview. Read more Also: neon User LTS, openSUSE Upgrades, Best Distro Poll

Chromium/Chrome News

It's Been A Quiet Year-End For BUS1, The Proposed In-Kernel IPC For Linux

With the Linux 4.10 kernel merge window expected to open this weekend, I was digging around to see whether there was anything new on the BUS1 front and whether we might see it for the next kernel cycle. While I have yet to see any official communication from the BUS1 developers, it doesn't look like it's happening for BUS1. In fact, it's been a rather quiet past few weeks for these developers working on this in-kernel IPC mechanism to succeed the never-merged KDBUS. Read more Also: Intel Working On 5-Level Paging To Increase Linux Virtual/Physical Address Space

Games for GNU/Linux