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Modeling Furniture in Blender

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As furniture is a key element, every item of furniture that we add to the scene increases the level of detail, and the sense of realism. We can classify furniture into two : internal and external furniture. With the first type, we have all the objects that populate our interior scenes such as sofas, beds, and chairs. The second type refers to items of urban furniture such as cars, fountains, and fences. This kind of modeling deals with smaller scales, and because of this, sometimes, we have to work at a more detailed level than we are used to. This can cause the modeling process to take a bit longer than usual, but only if we need to create a good level of detail for our models. In this type of modeling, we will use the concept of level of detail again. Another interesting thing about furniture is that we can keep the models that we create to build a good library. In this article by Allan Brito,we will learn how to add previously created furniture into new projects, decreasing the time needed to fill up the scene with furniture, with a good 3D models library. We even can download or buy models on the Internet. The only thing that we will have to do in this case is import the model into our scene.

Create Models or Use a Library?

There are two possibilities when working with furniture. We can create new furniture, or use pre-made models from a library. The question is: when must we use each type? Some people say that using a pre-made model is not very professional thing but what they forget to say is that most projects have a tight deadline, and we need a quick modeling process to be ready on time. So, what's most important for professionals? Getting things done, or telling the client that all the models were created just for his project?

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