Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Time's a' Wastin'

When I woke up this morning and started checking the news feeds for stuff to link to, I noticed a high degree of "Bill Gates' last day" stories out on the wires.

Curiously, a number of them speculated on the eventual health of Microsoft; the implication being that without Gates, Microsoft will implode. Sure. I vented on Twitter that Ballmer's been functionally behind the wheel for years anyway, so what does it matter?

That's the same argument I will give to those who will speculate that Gates' departure could be a positive effect on open source, as those in the company who are friendly towards open source will have more leeway to make a difference on the corporation's stance.

See Ballmer comment above. Gates may have set the overall strategy for open source policy (so imfamously revealed in his letter to hobbyists, but whatever else you think of him, Ballmer's no sock puppet. He really does not like open source.

More Here




There goes another Mehcro$haft FUDpucker...

Oy veh, there's nothing like seeing a managing editor of a Linux E-zine throwing the Linux Community under the bus in favor of the collective gluteus MAXimus of Redmond to make you want to check out the porcelain and lose your lunch *winces*... Dude stays flapping that yap and talking that ol' BullS***... He has no clue that Linux is indeed expanding to the masses, slowly, but steadily. The exploding market of green machines, such as the EEE netbook and the Atom CPU mobos for Mini-ITX micromachines, is the ideal sector for those Linux Distros. Meh-cro$haft has its market share attacked on both ends... Linux is growing on the low end ultra-portables for the masses, and Apple is hitting hard on the high end market. Oh well, as Dreadmond ratchets that jaw and their fanbois make sure that nose stays brown, they are letting their Bloatware deteriorate to the point that FOSS apps will be the superior versions. Combine this with the distros and engines becoming easier to use with each release, and while more people want to kick M$ to the curb, Linux will be a viable option to these ex-patriots. Just look at Mozilla... They were the Phoenix rising from the ashes of Netscape, and in a few short years, they snagged almost 20% market share. Not bad for an Open Source organization Big Grin OK, I'll cruise off of this soap box for now.
>---------<
The more I find out about Micro$haft Winblows, the more I like Linux. Go Open-Source, and use the money you save on licensing to build a Linux machine for a needy family!

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Eltechs Debuts x86 Crossover Platform for ARM Tablets, Mini-PCs

The product, called ExaGear Desktop, runs x86 operating systems on top of hardware devices using ARMv7 CPUs. That's significant because x86 software, which is the kind that runs natively on most computing platforms today, does not generally work on ARM hardware unless software developers undertake the considerable effort of porting it. Since few are likely to do that, having a way to run x86 applications on ARM devices is likely to become increasingly important as more ARM-based tablets and portable computers come to market. That said, the ExaGear Desktop, which Eltechs plans to make available next month, currently has some steep limitations. First, it only supports Ubuntu Linux. And while Eltechs said support for additional Linux distributions is forthcoming, there's no indication the product will be able to run x86 builds of Windows on ARM hardware, a feat that is likely to be in much greater demand than Linux compatibility. Read more

It's Elementary, with Sparks, and Unity

In today's Linux news Jack Wallen review Elementary OS and says it's not just the poor man's Apple. Jack Germain reviewed SparkyLinux GameOver yesterday and said it's a win-win. Linux Tycoon Bryan Lunduke testdrives Ubuntu's Unity today in the latest entry in his desktop-a-week series. And finally tonight, just what the heck is this Docker thing everybody keeps talking about? Read more

5 Linux distributions for very old computers

This is part 4 in a series of articles designed to help you choose the right Linux distribution for your circumstances. Here are the links to the first three parts: Which desktop environment should you use? 5 easiest to use Linux distributions for modern machines 5 easiest to use Linux distributions for older machines Some of you will have computers that are really old and none of the solutions presented thus far are of much use. This guide lists those distributions designed to run with limited RAM, limited disk space and limited graphics capabilities. Ease of use is sometimes comprimised when using the really light distributions but once you get used to them they are every bit as functional as a Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Read more

Open source software: The question of security

The logic is understandable - how can a software with source code that can easily be viewed, accessed and changed have even a modicum of security? opensource-security-question Open source software is safer than many believe. But with organizations around the globe deploying open source solutions in even some of the most mission-critical and security-sensitive environments, there is clearly something unaccounted for by that logic. According to a November 28 2013 Financial News article, some of the world's largest banks and exchanges, including Deutsche Bank and the New York Stock Exchange, have been active in open source projects and are operating their infrastructure on Linux, Apache and similar systems. Read more