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USB ADSL Modem Manager: Annoying window

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Software

Hi

I am a user of Ubuntu 7.10, kernel 2.6.22-14-generic. I have a SpeedTouch 330 USB ADSL Modem
I downloaded and installed the file usbadslmodemmanager_0.5.8_i386.deb which I found on http://www.squeezedonkey.com/svn/linux/trunk/releases/ubuntu/32-bit%20i386/.
I filled in my acces data to connect my provider.
I changed the permissions of pppd:
sudo chmod 755 /usr/sbin/pppd.

Now every time after I start up linux and logged in a window usually appears:
“Enter your password to perform administrative tasks”
“The application 'lsusb -vvv' lets you modify essential parts of your system”
“Password [ ]
After I filled in my password of my username Joris I can connect to internet.
Sometimes the window doesn't appear and then I can't start the USB ADSL Modem Manager.

How can I make it so that this window doen't appear anymore?
Why does this ask to my password? Is this a problem with permissions? Let me know something.
With thanks.

Joris V. H.

P.S. I live in Belgium and I speak Dutch. So my English is not very good.

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