Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

openSUSE 11.0 - Smooth Outside and Rough Inside

Filed under
OS
Linux
News
OSS
SUSE
Sci/Tech

openSUSE 11.0 has been one of the most anticipated distributions of the 2008 release season. In terms of innovation, openSUSE is perhaps the most ambitious of all the highly popular Linux distros so far this year. Since its 10.0 release to the open source world in 2006, openSUSE has experienced its share of ups and downs, not the least of which has been questionable quality assurance on final releases. Most notably, since adopting several poorly integrated package management backends in the 10.x series, openSUSE has alienated even some of its most loyal users. On the other hand, openSUSE has generally maintained its reputation of being polished and detail-oriented. What will the 11.0 release bring to the Linux scene?

Installation
Grade: C

The openSUSE 11.0 Live CD installer at first glance looks simple and attractive. Upon booting from the live CD, I was greeted by a very polished, animated, multilingual greeting screen. The live CD booted in less than 3 minutes to a live Gnome desktop. I immediately launched the live CD installer from the desktop link. In general I found it to be a pleasant installer, except for one glaring exception— The partitioning step proposes very invasive automatic partitioning changes. On my system, it suggested shrinking my Windows partition, deleting all of my existing Linux partitions, and creating a new partition for itself. I find this to be a potentially disastrous option. Installers like this that try to be overly-helpful only do a disservice to ignorant users.

http://www.techreview.uni.cc/osreviews/opensuse_11.0_review

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

today's leftovers

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: KDE Software

  • Wayland & Other Tasks Being Worked On For KDE Plasma 5.4
    Now that KDE Plasma 5.3 was released this week, KDE developers are starting to plan out and work on the new material intended for KDE Plasma 5.4.
  • Interview with Wolthera
    My name is Wolthera, I am 25, studied Game Design and currently studying Humanities, because I want to become a better game designer, and I hope to make games in the future as a job. I also draw comics, though nothing has been published yet. [...] After I played a lot with MyPaint, I heard from people that Krita 2.4 was the shit. When I went to the website at the time (which is the one before the one before the current) it just looked alien and strange, and worse: there was no Windows version, so I couldn’t even try it out. So I spent a few more years having fun with MyPaint alone, but eventually I got tired of its brush engine and wanted to try something more rough. When I checked Krita again, it had two things: a new, considerably more coherent website (the one before this one) and a Windows build. Around that time it was still super unstable and it didn’t work with my tablet. But MyPaint also had tablet problems, so I had no qualms about dual booting to Linux and trying it out there.
  • GSoC with KDE
    So, my project is titled: Better Tooling for Baloo. Let me begin by explaining what Baloo is. According to its wiki page it is "Baloo is a metadata and search framework by KDE." What exactly does it mean? Baloo is responsible for providing full text search capabilities to KDE applications. It doesn't end there it also provides searching on basis of metadata of various types of files. To acomplish this it indexes file contents and metadata using various plugins ,called extractors, to handle different types of files. It then exposes the data it has indexed with the help of various API's. So thats a very high level view of how it works. Now, my project, as the title states will provide better tools for Baloo. These tools will mainly be: