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One live DVD, one ton of Linux games

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LinuX-Gamers Live is a live DVD from Germany based on Arch Linux that includes nothing but games. Version 0.9.3 was released in June and provides an excellent means of sampling Linux games or setting up a home arcade, although a few of the games wouldn't run on my machine.

There are no productivity tools, Web browsers, or package managers here; this disc is all play and no work. Because it's a live DVD, no hard drive is required to run the games. Once you burn the downloaded image to a DVD, you have a portable arcade that will run on any x86 system with 512MB or more of RAM. A 3-D accelerated video card is also required for most of the games. Proprietary drivers for Nvidia and ATI-based video cards are included, so you can enable acceleration for those types of cards by simply answering a few dialogs during the boot process.

I downloaded the live DVD via BitTorrent, which as of this writing is the only way to get the live DVD. The download took a few hours. My test system consists of an AMD Athlon 64 X2 processor, 2GB of RAM, and two Nvidia 8600GT video cards connected by an SLI bridge. The DVD configured all of my hardware correctly, and both video cards were recognized, as well as my sound and network cards. As soon as I finished booting it, I was ready to start fragging.

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