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Why I Hate KDE? Paradigm

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KDE

This story has begun by a blog post from a man called Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols. He is ex-ZDNet and somewhat famous Linux journalist and long time KDE user. He tried out KDE 4.04 and dislike it (like me). Some might say KDE 4.0 is just developer preview (then why release it at first, huh?). He then tried KDE 4.1beta (which I haven’t) and also hate it. The consequence is he called for a fork of KDE project. Technically, all he wants is porting good old KDE 3.5 on Qt 4 platform but fork is fork.

At first glance, it might be yet another KDE flame war, as usual. But the most interesting point is, this time, it’s the KDE civil flame war. No GNOME lovers, no KDE haters. Just only KDE users, fanboys, advocates, evangelists who disagree on each other’s KDE future vision.

The reason why I don’t use KDE is obvious: Paradigm. (or perspective, way of thinking, approach, whatever)

It’s the same reason why I choose Python over Perl (and Java). and it is the crucial thing KDE folks are missing.

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