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Reiser tells authorities he strangled his wife during argument

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Reiser

Convicted killer Hans Reiser has admitted that he strangled his estranged wife Nina Reiser during a argument while his children played unaware in another part of the house in the Oakland hills, sources familiar with the investigation told the Oakland Tribune today.

Handcuffed to his attorney, Reiser led authorities Monday to what he says are the remains of his missing wife, Nina Reiser. The body was buried in a 4-foot-deep hole in the Oakland hills.

Sources said the murder occurred on Sept. 3, 2006, the last day Nina Resier was seen alive. It still isn't clear when Reiser moved her body, but he said he wrapped her body in sheets of plastic and later carried her in a duffle bag and carried to her unmarked grave.

"His motivation for (taking authorities to the grave) was to put some resolution to the whole thing and improve his posture with the case and bring closure to the family," Du Bois said.

That could mean Reiser is allowed to plead to the lesser crime of second-degree murder, which carries a sentence of 15 years to life as opposed to 25 years to life for first-degree murder.

"He realized that to ever be paroled, he would have to acknowledge responsibility and show remorse," Du Bois said.

The body was down a steep hillside in the 8200 block of Skyline Boulevard, which was a half-mile from where Hans Reiser was living with his mother.

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Also: Reiser: Guilty. Reiser4 Lives On

Police ID remains as software programmer's wife

AP @ SFGate: Police have confirmed that a body software programmer Hans Reiser led them to is that of the estranged wife he is convicted of killing.

Reiser led police Monday to remains buried not far from his home in the Oakland hills. Authorities say they were able to identify the body as Nina Reiser's through dental records, jewelry and clothing.

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That Subject Title was so convoluted I thought it was a ATANG1 post.

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