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Tech titans ready to brawl

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Sci/Tech

For years, Microsoft has been able to use its money and size to muscle aside its competitors.

Now it's facing a competitor it can't push around so easily -- Google.

The popular search engine is mounting what may be the most serious challenge yet to Microsoft's desktop dominance.

While most everyone agrees the battle is shaping up to be epic, the front lines aren't very clear yet. Microsoft traditionally makes desktop software. Google is known for its search engine. But both sides are quickly encroaching on each others' turf.

Jordan Rohan, an analyst for RBC Capital Markets, said Google has larger ambitions than most people realize. And those ambitions will put them squarely in Microsoft's path.

"Google has pulled off the greatest obfuscation in the history of Silicon Valley: Everyone thinks they're a one-trick pony," he said, referring to the firm's search engine's roots. "They're going after Microsoft in a big way."

Full Story.


In other news:

While some people worried about privacy issues, others on Saturday praised Google's proposal to blanket San Francisco with free wireless high-speed Internet access, saying it will help bring fast Web connections to more people in more places for less money than they are paying now.

Google in San Francisco: 'Wireless overlord'?.

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