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Linux can save us

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Linux

In case you haven't noticed, the economy is collapsing.

You can't afford to drive anywhere, and, even if you could, you may not have a GM car to drive there for much longer. Some of you may be losing your houses, and the mortgage companies that gave you that mortgage in the first place? IndyMac went down late last week and now the question of the day is which major national bank will follow it down.

What does this have to do with Linux? Everything.

With both people and companies having to squeeze a nickel's worth of good out of every penny, how long do you think people will be paying Microsoft for its imperfect operating systems and office suites? Vista Business SP1 'upgrade' has a list price of $199.95. Office 2007 Professional is $329.95. That's $529.90, or as much as a new low-end PC. Or, I could go with Ubuntu Linux for zero money down. if I wanted big business support, I could buy SLED (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop) 10 SP 2 from Novell for $50. SLED, like any desktop Linux, includes OpenOffice 2.4 for free.

Which one would you buy when your IT budget is going to be cut to the bone?

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re: Linux can save us

Let me know when Linux can make my A8 get 50 mpg.

This article writer is a major dumbass. It's obvious that he NEVER worked in a real business or managed a real IT shop.

When the IT budget is cut - you don't make ANY changes. You don't upgrade, you don't buy new stuff, you just leave everything well enough alone.

His idea would save his company some money - his salary - since any IT Manager dumb enough to propose changing OS and App's during an economic downturn so that EVERYONE would have to stop being productive and learn new skills would (and should) be fired.

SJVN

> This article writer is a major dumbass. It's obvious that he NEVER worked in a real business or managed a real IT shop.

He did UNIX for many years. Real business. Don't shoot him down yet, but this blog is sensationalist.

Interesting. For one, I

Interesting.

For one, I think all this hyperbole about the 'economic downturn' is just that. overblown and exaggerated. Most of the 'big thinkers' agree that this situation while getting uncomfortable in the short term, will start pull out in the 8 to 12 month projections.

I think there may be something to it because while other job markets are claiming to slow down, commercial construction is actually experiencing an upturn.

That's right, businesses are building. If they are building, they are not going to waste that investment by making poor IT choices

( Well, many will make poor IT choices but those are the ones who who make those bad choices normally due to misinformation, cheap POV toward IT or other excuses.)

More than likely, if they are in the new construction stage, they have already made their hardware, hence software, purchases, to be ready to move in asap.

The question is, where are the Linux consultants to encourage Linux/open source adoption at the critical stage?

Big Bear

MSM

Wow for a minute there I thought I was watching Fox news or CNN. I had to double check what site I was on, people that need to spread this crap to scare people in order to keep their jobs are pathetic. I was expecting to see him mention that we could use Linux to save money that way we could buy more guns to help with the comming appocalypse.

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