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CyberLink Sees Opportunities in Netbooks, Linux

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Linux
Software

Multimedia software maker CyberLink sees a lot of opportunities in the fast-growing netbook segment of the computer market, from online access to files stored on home PCs to multimedia software made for Linux OSs.

Some of the most popular netbooks, or mini-laptops, being launched come with options for far less storage space than mainstream laptops, such as Asustek's Eee PC 1000, Eee PC 901and Acer's Aspire one.

Many of them also run on a Linux OS, such as Linpus Linux Lite on the Aspire one and Linux OS by Xandros on the Eee PC. These netbooks can also come with Windows XP instead.

CyberLink Live, for example, allows users to access information on any of their PCs over the Internet. People can find their music and photo or video files, or work files. There's also an option to watch and record live TV shows. Software to hook users up to a free version of the online service is available, and it doesn't come with adware or other annoying features. A premium version is also available, and that's what allows scheduled TV program recording as well as management of all work file types, the highest quality of photo, video viewing, and more.

The company is in talks to bundle CyberLink Live in some netbooks, but declined to comment, saying it will make an announcement after a deal is completed.

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