Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Top 5 Awesome Linux Distro Upgrades Coming Out in Second Half of 2008

Filed under
Linux

The first half of 2008 has seen some really cool releases, such as OpenSuSe 11.0, Fedora 9 and Ubuntu 8.04.1, and some really lame ones too, like Gentoo 2008.0 and Linux XP 2008. We’re not done yet, though. There are still some pretty major distro releases, which will blow your mind. Let’s dive in and see!

1. Debian Lenny 5.0 (around September)debian
Shut up, Debian is awesome! The second beta of Lenny is already very stable, but lets wait until the strict Debian release team churns out the final version. Aside from the much awaited Iceweasel 3.0 (yaay!), notable new features of the new version of the most important community distribution are the 2.6.24 kernel and lots and lots of upgrades, including improved security.

2. Fedora 10 (October)
fedoraFedora has come a long way, but there’s still this little bit that needs to be improved in order to spread adoption. The new version 10 should be a step forward into the right direction (this time). Haskel support, a new version of RPM, cool artwork, the new KDE 4.1, and improved audio. Go take a look at the top proposed features. Of course, some of them won’t get implemented because new features have to be approved by the FESCo.

More Here




Where's PCLinuxOS in all of this?

One of the best and most popular distros out there was missing from the list? For shame...

Lenny

Lenny (Debian release 5) will have kernel 2.6.25, not 2.6.24. Which makes it interesting to Ubuntu 8.04 users, who are on 2.6.24. Lenny will have a later kernel and an older version of Gnome's virtual file system: the new one (as released in Ubuntu 8.04) still has a couple of annoying problems.

Also, Lenny is not in "beta 2". The installation software is, but Lenny has not reached "freeze" so no beta release is available yet, as far as I know.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Microsoft and Linux

GNOME News

  • gnome-boxes: Coder’s log
    So another two weeks have passed and it’s time to sum things up and reflect a little on the struggles and accomplishments that have marked this time period, which was quite a bumpy ride compared to the others, but definitely more exciting.
  • GNOME Keysign 0.6
    It’s been a while since I reported on GNOME Keysign. The last few releases have been exciting, because they introduced nice features which I have been waiting long for getting around to implement them.
  • Testing for Usability
    I recently came across a copy of Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works (book, 2005) by Goto and Cotler. The book includes a chapter on "Testing for Usability" which is brief but informative. The authors comment that many websites are redesigned because customers want to add new feature or want to drive more traffic to the website. But they rarely ask the important questions: "How easy is it to use our website?" "How easily can visitors get to the information they want and need?" and "How easily does the website 'lead' visitors to do what you want them to do?" (That last question is interesting for certain markets, for example.)

SUSE Leftovers

  • Newest Tumbleweed snapshot updates KDE Applications
    The latest openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has updated KDE Applications in the repositories to version 16.04.3. Snapshot 20160724 had a considerably large amount of package updates for Tumbleweed KDE users, but other updates in the snapshot included updates to kiwi-config-openSUSE, Libzypp to version 16.1.3, yast2-installation to version 3.1.202 and Kernel-firmware to 2016071
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 22
    openSUSE Conference’16, Hackweek 14 and the various SUSE internal workshops are over. So it’s time for the YaST team to go back to usual three-weeks-long development sprints… and with new sprints come new public reports! With Leap 42.2 in Alpha phase and SLE12-SP2 in Beta phase our focus is on bugs fixing, so we don’t have as much fancy stuff to show in this report. Still, here you are some bits you could find interesting.