Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Security is no secret: NSA takes Flask to the open-source community

Filed under
OSS

Architecture created by the National Security Agency and expanded with help from the open-source community will save the Defense Department and intelligence agencies millions in hardware costs.

Architecture created by the National Security Agency and expanded with help from the open-source community will save the Defense Department and intelligence agencies millions in hardware costs.

Analysts used to need multiple computers because they worked on separate machines for each classification level of data they accessed. Soon, users will be able to access data from a single console that could cost $500 or less, thanks to the NSA security architecture dubbed Flask.

With Flask, “we can guarantee that high-integrity data can’t be corrupted by untrustworthy entities or that sensitive data doesn’t leak to untrustworthy entities,” said Stephen Smalley, one of the chief developers of Flask at NSA. The best part is that the technology requires no specialized hardware or operating system.

And that is only one of the potential security benefits. NSA officials said they hope software vendors will adopt the technology to better secure their products.

The Linux community was one of the first groups to embrace Flask. With the help of open-source developers, NSA created a Linux security module based on Flask, called Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). It is now one of the core features in the widely used Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Full Story




More in Tux Machines

Compact, fanless, Cortex-A5 embedded computer runs on 3W

Artila’s “Matrix-700” control computer runs Linux on a Cortex-A5 SoC, and offers 8GB eMMC, plus three USB, four RS-232/485, GbE, and Fast Ethernet ports. The Matrix-700 is the first Cortex-A5 based model in Artila’s family of traditionally ARM9-driven Matrix industrial computers. The device is designed for non-stop operation in remote locations, such as device networking and remote monitoring. Read more

Terminator A Linux Terminal Emulator With Multiple Terminals In One Window

Each Linux distribution has a default terminal emulator for interacting with system through commands. But the default terminal app might not be perfect for you. There are so many terminal apps that will provide you more functionalities to perform more tasks simultaneously to sky-rocket speed of your work. Such useful terminal emulators include Terminator, a multi-windows supported free terminal emulator for your Linux system. Read
more

Fluxday: A no-fuss open source productivity tracker

It would have been easier if we already had an open source platform we could build on. Although we did manage to build it quickly without disrupting our main projects, other companies might find it easier to adopt an existing platform rather than allocate extra time towards building an in-house productivity management application. For that reason, we've made Fluxday an open source project. Read more

Solus Project to No Longer Offer a Release Schedule, Solus 1.2.1 Gets Delayed

Solus Project founder and architect Ikey Doherty announced on July 24, 2016, that the static release schedule for their Solus operating system is officially and completely dropped. Read more