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Welcome to my Nightmare

Filed under
Just talk

a flash of light, I see a wing
I think it's a bird, but he doesn't sing
in his mouth an engagement ring
lines of truth and lies blurring

another flash I think I see
drips of blood, he cackles at me
flaps of wings all over the tree
crashing waves come up from the sea

thunder explodes they all take flight
no one can see the carnage at night
my eyes adjust but not enough light
I can't see my life try as I might

lightning bolt, shredded white dress
this must be a nightmare me in bareness
I think of lost love as memories regress
sudden loud noise my heart oppress

sharp pain I feel across my face
more blood and tears all over the place
I fall to the floor crumpled in disgrace
in the wind black feathers and lace

fast as I run I can not escape
the beast gains intending to rape
focus my eyes it begins to reshape
silhouette of man, my chest agape

Next I see my heart on the floor
Silhouette turns, rain starts to downpour
You think it'd be him, but it's me to abhor
My blood drains off towards the shore

the greatest gift my love he forsake
leaving my heart with nothing but ache
darkness and loss and confusion make
this nightmare of pain I can not awake

-srlinton

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