Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Firefox add-on Glubble too clunky and restrictive as a children's Internet filter

Filed under
Moz/FF

Glubble is a free proprietary Firefox add-on from Glaxstar that limits the activity your child can perform online by blocking access to Web sites and filtering Google search results. For parents, a tool like Glubble can seem like the perfect answer to the problem of protecting kids from the unsavory elements of the Internet. But as I discovered through my use of Glubble, the questions surrounding the idea of Internet filtering don't come with easy answers.

Obtaining Glubble and getting it installed is easy. Download the Firefox add-on from Glubble.com and click Install. Create a Glubble account for yourself, and one for each child that will use the service. Glubble starts running right away, on top of the Firefox browser, setting up an initial "walled garden" consisting of a few dozen well-known sites for elementary-age children, and a more relaxed account for you, the parent. From there you can add or delete sites as you wish, with different configurations for each child, and each gets his or her own "secret homepage," as Glubble calls it. Children access their account by clicking on a tab at the top of the browser, which restarts Firefox (to disable any other running add-ons) and creates a secure environment tailored specifically for each child. The parental account can see and monitor what each child does, and children can customize their homepages with thumbnail pictures, or request that certain sites be added to the walled garden.

More here




More in Tux Machines

Graphics News

More of today's howtos

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat