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Firefox add-on Glubble too clunky and restrictive as a children's Internet filter

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Moz/FF

Glubble is a free proprietary Firefox add-on from Glaxstar that limits the activity your child can perform online by blocking access to Web sites and filtering Google search results. For parents, a tool like Glubble can seem like the perfect answer to the problem of protecting kids from the unsavory elements of the Internet. But as I discovered through my use of Glubble, the questions surrounding the idea of Internet filtering don't come with easy answers.

Obtaining Glubble and getting it installed is easy. Download the Firefox add-on from Glubble.com and click Install. Create a Glubble account for yourself, and one for each child that will use the service. Glubble starts running right away, on top of the Firefox browser, setting up an initial "walled garden" consisting of a few dozen well-known sites for elementary-age children, and a more relaxed account for you, the parent. From there you can add or delete sites as you wish, with different configurations for each child, and each gets his or her own "secret homepage," as Glubble calls it. Children access their account by clicking on a tab at the top of the browser, which restarts Firefox (to disable any other running add-ons) and creates a secure environment tailored specifically for each child. The parental account can see and monitor what each child does, and children can customize their homepages with thumbnail pictures, or request that certain sites be added to the walled garden.

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