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The open source jobs boom

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OSS

Looking for a good job in IT? Sharpen your knowledge of open source development frameworks, languages, and programming. A just-published study of available IT jobs found that 5 percent to 15 percent of the positions now on the market call for open source software skills.

Written by consultant and author Bernard Golden in conjunction with O'Reilly Media, the 50-page report attempts to document the spread of open source in the enterprise. Although the study did not quantify the actual percentage of open source products used in the enterprise, the strong growth in available jobs -- in a period when overall IT job growth may be slowing -- points to a surprising breadth of adoption. Indeed, the recession may be pushing budget-strapped IT execs to examine low-cost alternatives to commercial software.

Whatever, the reason, the study's results gainsay at least some of IT's conventional wisdom. "You still have people in large IT shops saying open source doesn't have much of a presence, so the employment numbers are surprising," Golden says.

Another important indicator of the open source growth spurt can be seen on SourceForge, which maintains a database of projects and downloads.

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Making sense of the open source job boom

weblog.infoworld: InfoWorld's Bill Snyder has a nice story about the rising demand for open source skills in the enterprise. Bill is quoting from Open Source in the Enterprise, written by Bernard Golden and published by O'Reilly media.

I wholeheartedly agree that companies are increasingly looking for developers that have experience with open source products. The methodology used doesn't allow us to know if the job truly requires work with open source products, tools, frameworks > 90% of the work day, or simply asks for ancillary skills relating to open source products, tools, frameworks.

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