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Ubuntu Linux is Much Better than Windows

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Ubuntu

I have worked with Ubuntu Linux for about 2 months and find that Ubuntu is much better than Windows. My computer is Thinkpad T43 laptop. The reasons that Ubuntu is better are:

Wireless network supported. My laptop's wireless network card is Intel PRO/Wireless 2200BG. After booting from Ubuntu live CD, the wireless network is usable. Even you can install Ubuntu and surf the Internet at the same time. However, Windows XP doesn't support the wireless network adapter. So I have to download the driver from other computer and copy it to my laptop. Obviously, it is dirty work.

No need to look for software all over the world. Ubuntu, or any Debian-based Linux distribution, uses APT to manager the software packages. If you need to install some software, for example, apache2, you don't have to look for a download site but just execute "sudo apt-get install apache2". Ubuntu will download all necessary packages from its repositories.

Perfect Chinese supported.

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Correction...

Linux is much better than Windows. Ubuntu != Linux. It's just one of the many flavors, but a solid one at that.

Thank You and ditto

Thank You and ditto

Why?

Your point may be true, but it is also unnecessary.

The author of the linked blog post represents a demographic that doesn't care about the differentiation between "Ubuntu" and "Linux", nor that other Linux distros exist (or even what a "distro" is, for that matter) - a demographic that is exceedingly important for the market share growth of not only Ubuntu, but all other Linux distributions as well.

A far more productive response to someone from this demographic lauding the virtues of Ubuntu (and, ergo, Linux - whether or not that someone knows it) would be to encourage that person and to offer support. For such person, "Ubuntu" = "Linux". Whether or not that person ever ventures from Ubuntu into other distros, isn't the most important thing that the person is using Linux rather than Windows?

I think the Linux community should do everything we can to support Windows expatriates who venture into the Brave New World of Linux, regardless of their distribution of choice. After all, I *am* one such person, being now a Kubuntu user after leaving the world of Windows over a year ago.

because it's about education

One thing about the Linux community, regardless of distro, is the emphasis on learning.

In learning about ANY distro, one must come face to face with the fact that it is only one of many faces or presentations of Linux and that Linux has so much more to offer than just what the Ubuntu team presents at any one given release.

That's why it is very important to make sure we emphasize Linux over distro, because no one distro can ever present all of what Linux has to offer.

Therefore, while Ubuntu is Linux, Linux is not just Ubuntu.

and we as a Linux community would do well to remember that.

Big Bear

What Education is Most important?

That may be true for established Linux community members; but remember, we're talking about the newest-of-the-new members of the community.

I don't care if the distro in question is *buntu, or OpenSUSE, or Fedora, or Mandriva, or PCLOS, or whatever; for such a community member, the most important education is how to be productive in their chosen distro - that is, how to live without Windows.

It is later (perhaps *much* later) that these community members will be prepared for education regarding what Linux and FOSS means, and the choices available to them.

Try to confound their distro-learning education with what-Linux/FOSS-means education will only make their Windows-to-Linux transition that much more difficult.

It's about choice...

We should promote others to explore Linux, but not for everyone to all jump on the Ubuntu bandwagon. Ubuntu is a solid distro worthy of anyone from the inexperienced to the very experienced, but there are plenty of other distros that each offer different, but valid user experiences. Mandriva, Suse, PCLinuxOS, Linux Mint, and Fedora, just to name of few, are all great distros that new users should also explore.

If we corral everyone into the Ubuntu camp, we are essentially telling everyone that this is how Linux is. It's not. This is one experience. Other experiences are out there. Mandriva, Suse, and Fedora are quite different than Ubuntu. We also run the risk of making one distro so powerful that it leads Linux development in a certain direction. This is bad. Choice is good. Choice means competition. Choice means innovation. Choice means the end user wins.

It's Also About Knowing Your Audience

Remember, we're not talking about promoting Linuxto someone; we're talking about someone who has discovered a Linux distro explaining why he believes that distro is better than Windows, which he used to use.

Yes, *we* know that almost all of his points would apply to many other distros; but that knowledge is irrelevant to him *at this point*.

I'm not saying that anyone has to "jump on the Ubuntu bandwagon"; I'm just saying that for users such as *this* one, the best/most productive way to promote Linux is to support and encourage his use of *his* chosen distro.

As he gets more experienced/advanced, might this user discover the world of choice and distros available to him? Certainly. As he does so, might he decide that another distro suits him better than his current choice of Ubuntu? Quite possibly.

Is any of that relevant to his experience *right now*, learning to use Ubuntu as a replacement for Windows?

Not one bit.

Honestly, I think more people need to stop insisting others get off the "Ubuntu bandwagon", and instead question whether they themselves have jumped on the "anti-Ubuntu bandwagon" - and why they have done so.

choice equals responsibility

no one forced them to try Linux or leave windows.

That is a choice the user makes for themself.

As such, they are responsible for educating themself.

Linux does not exist just to appease windows refugees. If ubuntu wants to take on the role of MS refugee distro, let them, that does not incur responsibility of the rest of the Linux community to be at the beck and call of people who refuse to pick up a book.

That does not mean Linux as a whole OS needs to change to be acceptable to those used to a different OS. If one decides to leave the "country" of their origin, then it is incumbent upon them to learn something about the place they are going, not expect everyone in the new place to change the laws to fit what the refugee wants to see.

sorry. Windows is Windows and Linux is Linux, both are OS's and that's about where the comparison stops.

Folks that don't want to learn Linux are welcome to enjoy Windows or visit the Apple people maybe.

Big Bear

And Apparently, Knowledge Equals Arrogance

Why are you on such a high horse?

This user didn't ask for anything from anyone.

He simply discovered Ubuntu, and decided to write about his experience and opinion regarding why he believes Ubuntu is better than Windows.

Period.
End of story.

Why do you (or anyone else) think that you have the right to tell this person the things about which he *must* educate himself? He has asked for nothing from you, and owes nothing to you.

But, your arrogant and condescending attitude toward this nascent Linux user could very well drive him away form Linux, and either back to Microsoft or toward Apple.

How does that outcome help accomplish any of the goals or ideals of the Linux community?

You appear to share the "KDE doesn't need users" attitude espoused by some KDE developers that caused such a ruckus a few weeks ago. I don't want to re-hash that controversy, but I do want to make a point: KDE needs users just as Linux needs users. That is, users - people who do nothing but use (consume, whatever term you wish to emply) - are the logical conclusion of the efforts of the Linux community.

Rather than pushing them away (as your attitude surely will), the Linux community should be shouting for joy that ordinary, run-of-the-mill, Windows-bred users are finding Linux and discovering its benefits versus Windows.

Then, when such users start asking questions, start pointing them toward the means to educate themselves. Let these users be introduced to the joy of discovery that is the Linux community, rather than making them feel like pariahs simply because of their ignorance.

you assume way too much

I think you need to look up the words you throw out.

I wasn't being arrogant or anything else.

I was being honest. Just because you disagree with someone else or don't like their opinion doesn't mean you get to go around calling people names. that's childish.

Perhaps if you educated yourself about Linux a little more, you would understand that Linux is not about wooing users from another OS. It is not about a winner take all competition and is is most certainly not about trying to appease one segment of the computer using market.

I am not pushing any one away, I am encouraging them to educate themselves. Would you tell someone they shouldn't educate themself about the school they attend or the subject they study?

of course not, that's absurd.

Why is it you have such a problem with the concept of users being educated?

Also, he didn't 'just' equate his experience to Linux, he equivocated ubuntu as linux and all we did was make a simple correction that ubuntu is not the sole representative of linux. It should have been over at that. Instead, you chose to become upset over people not allowing someone to be ignorant.

By the way, before you go ballistic about the word 'ignorant', it isn't a bad word, it just means someone who hasn't been educated or informed on the subject.

Please, buy a dictionary and read a bit about Linux before you go off half cocked at others who simply wish to inform others of correct Linux information

In Which We Discuss Assumptions

First, I didn't call you names; I equated your attitude toward the original blog poster with arrogance. Since you fail to understand that equation, let me explain:

You said:

no one forced them to try Linux or leave windows.

That is a choice the user makes for themself.

As such, they are responsible for educating themself.

The arrogant attitude in this statement is the belief that you have any right to tell this user the things about which he needs to educate himself. In fact, you have no right to do so, whatsoever. Claiming authority where you have none exemplifies arrogance.

Next, you said:

Linux does not exist just to appease windows refugees. If ubuntu wants to take on the role of MS refugee distro, let them, that does not incur responsibility of the rest of the Linux community to be at the beck and call of people who refuse to pick up a book.

The arrogant attitude in this statement is that you assume that the original blog poster wishes to be appeased, and that you assume that the original blog poster wants you to assume some responsibility toward him or to be at his beck and call, and finally, that you assume that he has not (or would not) pick up a book to educate himself.

You know none of the above to be true. Thus, your assumptions about him also exemplify arrogance.

Next you said:

That does not mean Linux as a whole OS needs to change to be acceptable to those used to a different OS. If one decides to leave the "country" of their origin, then it is incumbent upon them to learn something about the place they are going, not expect everyone in the new place to change the laws to fit what the refugee wants to see.

Again, you assume that the original blog poster wishes Linux to change, or that he wishes the "laws" of the community to change to fit him. You know none of the above to be true.

Finally, you said:

Folks that don't want to learn Linux are welcome to enjoy Windows or visit the Apple people maybe.

Once again, you assume that the original blog poster doesn't want to learn Linux. But, the most arrogant attitude manifested in your comment is the assertion that this blog poster is "welcome to enjoy Windows or visit the Apple people" - for no other reason than the blog poster had the (apparent) audacity of stating *his opinion* that Ubuntu Linux is better than windows, while making the (apparently) egregious omission of stating that "Ubuntu != Linux" and therefore Linux is better than Windows.

What gives you the right to tell this person that he is not welcome in the Linux community, simply because he stated his opinion that Ubuntu Linux (and not Linux in general) is better than Windows? Your assumption of the right to tell this person that he is not welcome in the Linux community is the most glaring example of an arrogant attitude in your entire comment.

Now, since I have addressed your claim of my ad hominem attack against you - and have more than sufficiently put that claim to rest - let me address the rest of your comment.

You seem to confuse my understanding of Linux with that of the original blog poster's. *My* understanding of Linux, the Linux community, and the FOSS movement are entirely irrelevant to our discussion of the original blog poster's comments.

In truth, I do not disagree with you. I believe that education is important, and that we empower ourselves by learning and understanding the great wealth of choice we have available with respect to our computing needs.

That said, with such a new user as the original blog poster, what benefit do you think you will gain by approaching his blog post with the attitude that he needs to be "corrected"?

Wouldn't far greater dividends result from presenting that information in a less combative manner?

Perhaps, comment on his blog post to say, "You're right; Ubuntu is better than Windows for all of those reasons! But most of those reasons also apply to Linux in general. Be sure to check out the many great distributions available; you might find something you like even better!"

Wouldn't that approach be more welcoming and educational? Wouldn't that approach better help bring such new Linux users into the community?

That is, essentially, the entirety of my original point.

You're both wrong

Since we're being oh so picky, you're both wrong.

I'm not sure what the original blogger was smoking, but saying the Linux (of any flavour) is better then XP or even Vista is laughable.

Desktop Linux works mediocre at best (and no, I'm not impressed with spinning cubes and sliding windows).

It's not that Desktop Linux is all that inept (although it's certainly isn't a uniform UI) but it's the lack of Applications (especially GOOD applications).

Why oh why would I want to waste my time and productivity learning inferior wanna-be apps? Except for a teeny tiny handful of Linux Apps that are actually good (and most of those are cross-platform open source apps), most are utter crap when compared to their Window (or Mac) counterparts.

Of course I use computers as a business tool, not as a hobby, so perhaps your mileage (and goals) will differ from mine.

//ok, now continue on with My Linux can beat up Your Linux discussion.

Pardon the Interruption

*Looks up at URL and web site name*

And you are here, why?

As for the rest of your post: it is devoid of any constructive content, and is not worthy of response.

When I posted, you might

When I posted, you might notice, I did not say " hey you OP", nor was Ispecicific to an individual. my points are for ANYONE that might try Linux.

And since when is it arrogance to express one's opinion in a public area? One might say the same for you to impose your own rules of interaction upon me.

it has nothing to do with arrogance or anything else.

FACT: Linux is a free OS, one of those aspects is, there is no one, NO ONE who is responsible for hand holding anyone who comes to use Linux. If some want to charge for handholding, fine, so be it. If some are gracious enough to hand hold, again, fine, it's their choice. But it is not an obligation or incumbent upon any Linux user to assume a role of marketer, sales rep or tech support just because some one is new to Linux and wants their hand held.

Also, you seem to suggest repetetively that there is some organized recruiting effort to win over windows users to Linux. hmm, last I looked in the GPL, Linus Torvalds comments, Free software foundation, hell, not even Richard Stallman has ever suggested we are here to "win" windows users or that it is a goal. so lighten up.

If you have assumed some notion of taking windows users away, yay for you, but don't just assume the rest of the Linux using community has that same goal.

I don't give a rat's ass if any windows user comes along to use Linux. It's not about competition with MS or Apple.

And if my thinking that all persons interested in using Linux would best be served by doing some homework and educating themselves as a matter of course, then that is my opinion and I have as much right to post it as you have to yours.

Thanks for the interesting debate.

Big Bear

Context Is Important

I realize that you didn't directly reference the OP in your comments; however, those comments reside in the comment thread of a specific blog post. Thus, it is a logical assumption that those comments would have been made in the context of that blog post.

The context - a blog post about a specific user's experience and opinion - is the only reason that I even spoke up.

You see, I fully agree with you on most of your points. I just don't think they were applicable or beneficial within the given context.

That said, I really don't understand why you keep coming back to the issue of hand-holding or assuming responsibility for another. As far as I can tell, you're the only one to bring it up - again, in this context.

I'm also not trying to suggest that some organized or even concerted effort to woo Windows users does or needs to exist within the Linux community. However, I think it is unwise to suggest that the goals of the Linux community would not be served by having both a larger user base and a larger percentage of market share. Aside from what should prove long term to be very meaningful inroads into technologically underdeveloped areas, that user base - and that market share - will come from converted Windows users.

So, yes, I believe it is important at least to welcome those Windows converts into the community - and I believe that you *should* care whether or not Windows users come along to use Linux.

As I've said, I'm one of those converts. I have a thick enough skin not to be offended by any intended or unintended slight. But, yes, I do see one of the ways that I can contribute to the Linux community to be to help welcome other Windows refugees.

Oh, and by the way, while many of the Linux luminaries may not have a direct interest in wooing Windows users, but I know of at least one that does: Mark Shuttleworth, whose Bug #1 implies that he cares very much whether or not Windows users come along to use Linux.

Again, I agree with you that all Linux users would be best-served by educating themselves as much as possible. I just think that we should let some users get their feet wet before trying to force them to jump into the deep end.

There's nothing wrong with testing the water first. After all, this discussion is taking place in response to one person who has done so: he tested the waters - yes, even the waters of one sea - and found them to be better than what he had experienced previously.

Let him continue to explore the waters of that sea, and eventually he will come to realize that his sea is only but a part of a vast ocean.

(End cheesy metaphor)

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