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PCLinuxOS: Definitely “Radically Simple”

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PCLOS

The slogan for PCLinuxOS is “Radically Simple” and, as far as I can tell, it might be one of the most fitting operating system slogans I have seen. But does it apply across the board? From start to finish? I decided it had been too long since I had tried this distribution so I went about giving it a go. I have to say I was certainly impressed.

With some distributions, along with the claim of being the easiest, comes the stigma of being overly simple, or “dumbed down”. Some of these distributions come with “helpful” widgets and graphics that look as if they were targeting an elementary school class. Not PCLinuxOS. PCLinuxOS retains a professional look and feel while remaining one of the easiest to use Linux distributions available. Let’s take a look at what PCLinuxOS offers.
Based Upon…

PCLinuxOS is based upon Mandriva and uses the Mandriva control center and Draklive installer. Along with Mandriva technology, PCLinuxOS is bolstered by patches from OpenSuSE, Gentoo, Fedora, Ubuntu, and Debian. Let’s think about this one. You have available a distribution that benefits from all of the other outstanding distributions. So from the very beginning PCLinuxOS holds much promise.

On top of a strong foundation PCLinuxOS offers KDE 3.5.6 which is one of the more stable and user-friendly of the larger desktop environments.

But it’s not what’s installed that makes PCLinuxOS so “radically simple”. No. What makes PCLinuxOS so radically simple is how it keeps the user from having to do tasks they aren’t used to doing. Let’s take a look.

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