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University of Stirling Migrates SAP Application Servers to Linux

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Linux

Red Hat has helped the University of Stirling in Scotland to migrate its SAP application servers, that manage the Human Resources and Payroll functions, to run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The migration has resulted in a three fold improvement in performance and in lower project costs.

The SAP HR and Payroll environment which supports approximately 2000 staff members at Stirling University was showing worsening performance after application upgrades. Stirling turned to its preferred IT partner, Abtech Computer Services UK, who is a Red Hat Advanced Partner as well as an HP Linux Elite Partner, for services.

The University of Stirling decided to migrate to a two tier system running the SAP application tier on HP Proliant Servers (HP Proliant DL380) running Red Hat Enterprise Linux. "We went with Red Hat because it offers a high level of support and stability for critical applications such as SAP." said Martyn Peggie, HR Information System Manager at Stirling University.

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