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Why Virtualization isn't all that.

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Hardware

There are certain situations I can agree virtualization can be useful and efficient.

Development/ programming is probably the best environment. One can write code and test it without worry of botching the whole system up.

There are lots of people who push, aggressively, for use of virtualization in servers though and that is an area I strongly disagree with. Especially where Linux and OpenSource is concerned.

Now, everyone has their own opinion and is entitled to it. Some folks are just very excited about the perceived potential in virtualization in regard to maximizing resource effieciency.

The state of computer hardware to date, is made to go bad. It is made to be replaced, not repaired.

It is a concept called "planned obsolescence" and was generally made notorious by AT&T after Ma Bell broke up.

Instead of leasing telephones, they created cheap phones, made of cheap parts, designed to fail after a certain amount of usage. This allowed them to make more money in phone sales by selling the first phone, then replacement phones. A repairman didn't come out to fix the phone anymore. You go to the store and buy another.

They designed it that people wouldn't have to wait very long before the phone needed to be replaced.

The same technological snakeoil is sold by computer and electronics makers today.

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re: Virtualization

Why that blogger isn't "all that" (and completely clueless).

Modern server (or enterprise) class hardware is meant to last WAY longer then it will most likely be used due to performance/capacity increase in hardware over time.

Plus, anything Mission Critical ALWAYS has at least a warm spare on site (unless your IT staff are complete morons).

Not to mention that basic Statistics shows that your failure rate will be waaaaay lower running 10 VM servers on 1 physical box, then 10 actual servers.

The fact that you can migrate VM's from one running host to another, the energy (and cooling and space) cost reduction, and the greater utilization of hardware resources means that Virtualization IS "all that" and more.

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