Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE 4.1 Pushes Cross-Platform Support, UI

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

With the release of Version 4.1 of the KDE Linux desktop July 29, the KDE community made statements on several fronts, including advanced cross-platform support and overall improvements in the look and feel of the GUI.

In an interview with eWEEK, Adriaan de Groot, vice president of KDE e.V., the nonprofit organization that represents the KDE Project in legal and financial matters, said KDE 4.1 makes the move away from technology preview and toward being the worthy successor to the successful six-year run by KDE 3.
De Groot said KDE 4.1 advances the goal of having the free software desktop run across a host of operating systems.

"The .0 release was very limited and we're now getting over that," de Groot said. "The range of platforms has expanded again, where KDE 4.0 was basically a Linux-only desktop. For 4.1, we're realizing the cross-platform benefits that we had in mind for KDE 4, so it runs on free software operating systems like FreeBSD and OpenSolaris and also on proprietary systems like Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. That's one of the reasons that it was important to get KDE 4.0 out relatively early: to mark a line in the sand and kick off the porting efforts for KDE 4. I know both the FreeBSD and OpenSolaris KDE communities had 4.1 in mind as a good target to make available on those platforms."

More Here




More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Kernel Space/Linux

today's howtos

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more