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The Right Linux Distribution

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Linux

In a previous column, I asserted that Linux is ready to meet the demands of corporate desktops, while it is still some way off from being ready for mass use in the consumer environment. But, with that said, the obvious question that remains is: which distribution is right for your organisation?

One of the challenges that face new users of Linux, be it individuals or businesses, is in choosing the right distribution for them, out of the thousands that are available. When it comes to desktop Linux, there are several distributions that could be considered, and all offer seemingly similar advantages from a usage and feature perspective.

At a feature level, Linux is Linux. If you are able to make something work on one version or distribution on Linux, it is almost certain that this can be repeated on other distributions. This is thanks to the common underlying Linux architecture that is employed by any true Linux distribution.

The adaptation of something from one Linux distribution to another might require some work, but it is always possible. As such, features and applications are not solid differentiators and do little to help businesses decide on which Linux to use for their desktops.

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