Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Howto Securely Wipe A Harddrive With Linux

Filed under
Security

Howto Securely Wipe A Harddrive With Linux
By drendeah

During this tutorial you will learn why it is important to wipe a harddrive and how to do it.

First of all, some explanations. A lot of people use storage media (such as hard drives, USB sticks, etc), and keep their private data there. Private data may include personal photos, that nobody should see, personal chat logs, credit card information, private projects you work on, and so on. Of course you don't want all this data to get into the hands of somebody you don't trust, or maybe you don't want anyone to see this private information.

Let's suppose that you use a separate hard drive to store all this private information. The hard drive is small, and you don't have any space left. You decide to buy a bigger hard drive. You go on and buy the new hard drive, and begin moving the files from one hard drive to another. You make sure there is nothing left on the old hard drive and indeed it's 100% free. Now, let's further suppose that you give this old hard drive, as a gift, to some friend of yours. What happens next is your worse nightmare. All your sensitive data is in your friends hand. Even if he is your friend, he has no right to hold that data. You wonder what is wrong, after all, you deleted the files didn't you?

Well, what went wrong is that, by simply deleting the files and directories, you won't achieve much. Files can be recovered after deletion. So just deleting them won't help. For the purpose of completely wiping the data, we can use a specially designed linux tool, called "shred".

For the purpose of giving some examples of "shred" usage we will be using a fresh install of Ubuntu 8.04.1. shred should already be installed, and ready to use.

Full article at: http://www.linuxsecurityforum.org/f5/howto-securely-wipe-a-harddrive-with-linux-t189.html

More in Tux Machines

Battle of the sub-$450 Android phones: ZTE Axon vs OnePlus 2 vs Moto X Style

Over the past two weeks we have seen three new Android phones announced that are priced to challenge Samsung, LG, and HTC devices typically found starting at $600. Read more

The AMD Radeon R9 Fury Is Currently A Disaster On Linux

When AMD announced the Radeon R9 Fury line-up powered by the "Fiji" GPU with High Bandwidth Memory, I was genuinely very excited to get my hands on this graphics card. The tech sounded great and offered up a lot of potential, and once finally finding an R9 Fury in stock, shelled out nearly $600 for this graphics card. Unfortunately though, thanks to the current state of the Catalyst Linux driver, the R9 Fury on Linux is a gigantic waste for OpenGL workloads. The R9 Fury results only exemplifies the hideous state of AMD's OpenGL support for their Catalyst Linux driver with a NVIDIA graphics card costing $200 less consistently delivering better gaming performance. Read more

Remix Mini Is the First Android PC, Runs Lollipop-Based Remix OS

Remix Mini is now on Kickstarter as the world's first true Android PC and its makers, Jide Technology, just might be the first company that takes an Android OS and makes it run like a proper desktop. Read more

Snappy Ubuntu Core 15.04 Gets a Second Stable Release

A second Snappy Ubuntu Core 15.04 iteration has been released by Canonical, and the new version comes with a reworked boot logic for BeagleBone Black, among other features. Read more