Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux is still not ready for the masses

Filed under
Linux

THE GREAT LINUX debate still rumbles on, and looks set to continue for some time. While market share has been creeping up on the desktop, it can't match the impact and use of Windows - yet Linux advocates will not tire of pushing their beloved Tux onto a public tired of Microsoft's efforts.

But the operating system just isn't ready for day-to-day use by non-experts. A mass of Linux fanboys will comment below and strenuously deny this, but those of us who are a little less biased, and have a chunk of common-sense, realise it simply isn't user-friendly enough to provoke a mass move from the much friendlier Microsoft Windows.

GUI Eye Candy

Like it or not, eye candy, special effects, translucent windows, etc, are inevitably going to attract 'normal' PC users.

The effect of these seemingly nice-to-haves should not be under-estimated in the battle to attract the masses to a new operating system.

Similarly to a eye candy, a swish, good-looking, highly usable and, most-importantly, intuitive user interface will bring users to an OS in droves.

A number of Linux advocates will state that eye candy should be second to technology, form and function, but yet bemoan the lack of uptake of their chosen distribution.

More Here




Linux still not ready for the masses?

Every couple of weeks, or so, someone out there in the land of journalism volunteers their opinion about Linux supposedly not being ready for the mass market, being complicated and complex, stating that nothing works and complicated hacking is required to get things going, etc. Just today, we find a piece like this here.

This truly surprises me, and I wonder what distro the author has been testing lately? For example, implying that the GNU/Linux desktop doesn't offer eye candy, the article states:

Rest @ geekzone

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

SUSE Chasing Partners

Asian Penguins turn failed program into a Linux success

The Community School of Excellence (CSE) Asian Penguins are the world's first and only Linux user group based in a Hmong charter school. A failed Windows laptop program at the school was turned by the Asian Penguins into a Linux success. Stu Keroff is the technology coordinator at the Community School of Excellence, a middle school located in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is a licensed elementary education and middle school social studies teacher, and a long-time Linux enthusiast. Stu founded and advises the Asian Penguins. Read more

Testing The BCache SSD Cache For HDDs On Linux 4.8

It has been over one year since last testing the mainline Linux kernel's BCache support for this block cache that allows solid-state drives to act as a cache for slower hard disk drives. Here are some fresh benchmarks of a SATA 3.0 SSD+HDD with BCache from the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. Read more

Debian Project mourns the loss of Kristoffer H. Rose

Kristoffer was a Debian contributor from the very early days of the project, and the upstream author of several packages that are still in the Debian archive nowadays, such as the LaTeX package Xy-pic and FlexML. On his return to the project after several years' absence, many of us had the pleasure of meeting Kristoffer during DebConf15 in Heidelberg. Read more