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Linux is still not ready for the masses

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THE GREAT LINUX debate still rumbles on, and looks set to continue for some time. While market share has been creeping up on the desktop, it can't match the impact and use of Windows - yet Linux advocates will not tire of pushing their beloved Tux onto a public tired of Microsoft's efforts.

But the operating system just isn't ready for day-to-day use by non-experts. A mass of Linux fanboys will comment below and strenuously deny this, but those of us who are a little less biased, and have a chunk of common-sense, realise it simply isn't user-friendly enough to provoke a mass move from the much friendlier Microsoft Windows.

GUI Eye Candy

Like it or not, eye candy, special effects, translucent windows, etc, are inevitably going to attract 'normal' PC users.

The effect of these seemingly nice-to-haves should not be under-estimated in the battle to attract the masses to a new operating system.

Similarly to a eye candy, a swish, good-looking, highly usable and, most-importantly, intuitive user interface will bring users to an OS in droves.

A number of Linux advocates will state that eye candy should be second to technology, form and function, but yet bemoan the lack of uptake of their chosen distribution.

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Linux still not ready for the masses?

Every couple of weeks, or so, someone out there in the land of journalism volunteers their opinion about Linux supposedly not being ready for the mass market, being complicated and complex, stating that nothing works and complicated hacking is required to get things going, etc. Just today, we find a piece like this here.

This truly surprises me, and I wonder what distro the author has been testing lately? For example, implying that the GNU/Linux desktop doesn't offer eye candy, the article states:

Rest @ geekzone

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