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Software as a Service is a key to Linux Growth

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Linux

There are many very good sites that offer software that many Linux and other Opensource OS's can use to expand their usefulness and presence in the average Joe's home desktop.

Sites like American Greetings design and print allows people to sign up for a yearly membership and print commercial quality paper goods in their own home. Often, the home software version of this can cost anywhere between $20 to $100 and become outdated each year as the newest version is introduced.

Millions of users like to use and want to be able to print greeting cards at home. I am not one of them, but my wife is. So are many people I know. They consider it big time saver and have the opportunity to customize and make a card or printed item more personal by having access to software like this.

What other kinds of software is missing from the free software world that hasn't made it over yet? How many of these are available as a service? A great many of them.

So, what's the problem? Why aren't Linux and other OpenSource users signing up en masse to use these services?

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today's leftovers

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    Ken's love of programming eventually led to a job at Canonical, and then he learned about the Kramden Institute. "At first I was just excited about what they do for so many children," he says. "It's truly an amazing organization. After hearing about Kramden, I very quickly signed up to work a Wednesday work night, which was really a blast. Wednesday evening at Kramden is an event to remember. They are incredibly well organized and almost always have a full house. It's a community of folks that want to help these children; I just fit right in."
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