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Dell's Latitude-On instant OS detailed, screenshooted

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Linux

Seems the act of waking a sleeping laptop to a full-blown OS is no longer in vogue. We're not sure when this happened though we're pretty sure that ASUS' decision to embed SplashTop into its P5E3 mobo had something to do with it. The benefit, of course, is an extension of battery life to days instead of hours assuming that you're not regularly booting into Vista or XP.

Anyway, these new instant-on OSes are all the rage these days in products from netbooks, to ultra-portable fashion statements, and now business laptops thanks to Dell. Dell's solution, as applied to its newly announced Latitude E4200 and E4300, features a fully-dedicated, Linux-based system-on-a-chip subsystem consisting of a low-power ARM processor and flash memory that runs independent of your laptop's CPU and storage.

More Here and Here




How would an ARM Grab the Screen?

As an embedded ARM developer I cannot understand how the ARM processor could grab the screen, dram and wifi and ethernet chip in a standard system.

All I can think of is the ARM and the GPU or the wifi controller are the same chip and the processor is shut down.

Not exactly the tale that is told.

A GPU is typically a long risc machine. Broadcom typically uses MIPS to run the wifi core.

Hasta Le Vista Baby!

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