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Limelight Networks: Why the Olympics didn't "Melt" the Internet

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I admit it, even I was skeptical. When I received the first demonstration of the Silverlight plugin and the NBCOlympics.com web site back in March of this year at the 2008 Microsoft Technology Summit, where a group of Open Source experts gathered from around the world were asked for feedback on various aspects of Microsoft’s emerging technologies, I truly believed that when they finally rolled that website out, that NBC was going to be overwhelmed with traffic and the site would come to a screeching halt, resulting in a catastrophic embarrassment for Microsoft and NBC.

As it turns out, for all the heavy lifting, such as the streaming video, it’s all going through infrastructure hosted by Limelight Networks.

Who are these Limelight guys, anyway? They are a Tempe, Arizona-based company which operates a global network of fiber-optic interconnected datacenters. Their backbone is capable of 2 Terabits (Tbps) per second of sustained data transfers and they globally replicate approximately 5 Petabytes of data on their storage network, which utilize a mix of proprietary vendor SAN replication technology such as EMC SRDF and Open Source-based technology developed by Limelight itself. Surprise! There’s some Linux back-ending all that Windows Media.

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