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Breaking America's grip on the net

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Web

You would expect an announcement that would forever change the face of the internet to be a grand affair - a big stage, spotlights, media scrums and a charismatic frontman working the crowd.

But unless you knew where he was sitting, all you got was David Hendon's slightly apprehensive voice through a beige plastic earbox. The words were calm, measured and unexciting, but their implications will be felt for generations to come.

There are dozens of unanswered questions but all the answers are pointing the same way: international governments deciding the internet's future. The internet will never be the same again.

Full Story.

Seems Fishy

This article seems a tad fishy. I could not find any other source for this info except the one listed. I can't image the ecommerce sites in America will let this happen. Anyone doubting that US is the main contributor should take a quick look at the root server list - then tell me how much the rest of the world contributes. Doubtful any of the Counties listed as being in favor (except for the UK) has neither the technology or the money to make it happen.

re: Seems Fishy

vnunet says, "At the Geneva meeting the US defended its position insisting that the changes go against the "historic role" played by the US in controlling the top level of the internet.

The discussion now looks set to go before a UN summit of world leaders next month who are expected to rule in favour of the EU proposal.

The US could also try to head off attempts to dismantle Icann by suggesting that such a move could weaken initiatives to reduce online crime.

According to Reuters, the UN International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has offered to step in. ITU chief Yoshio Utsumi said: "We could do it if we were asked to."

But the statement was dismissed by US State Department official David Gross. "We will not agree to the UN taking over management of the internet," he said.

EU fights US for control of the internet.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Thanks for the additional new

Thanks for the additional news source. It will be VERY interesting in seeing how this plays out. For all of USA's (minor) faults, screwing up the Internet is NOT one of them.

OAN (on another note) - what's up with the site? seems to be running at a snails pace these last couple of days?

re: site

yeah, I been osnews'd! Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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