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What does Michael Phelps have in common with Linus Torvalds?

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Linux

What does the most prolific Olympian of all time have in common with one of the greatest, if not the greatest computer programmer in history? --No, it's definitely not the physique, or their love for Speedo.

Speed
There's no question about Michael Phelps' speed. He currently holds an outstanding 7 world records in swimming. In case you didn’t know, at age 15, he became the youngest man ever to set a swimming world record.

Linus Torvalds is known for pioneering the lightning fast, "release early, release often" software development model. This is a remarkable fact: When Torvalds was 21 years old, during the early years of Linux, he released a new kernel version more than once a day!

Stamina
Winning a record breaking 8 gold medals in one Olympic Game requires amazing strength and endurance. We watched in awe when Phelps achieved this at the Beijing Olympics. He has also won 6 gold medals in the 2004 Athens Olympics, and he said he will try to get some more in London four years from now.

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