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3 Must Have Linux-powered Netbooks

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Linux
Hardware

I'm planning to acquire a small, ultra-lightweight, low-cost, and Linux-powered subnotebook before the end of the year. So, I began doing some research (used Google), and started my quest to find the perfect netbook.

Of the many netbooks currently available, and also those that are soon to be released, I only have 3 favorites. And, if I were to buy today, I will definitely get either one of the three. I'll share to you my current list of must have Linux-powered netbooks.

Acer Aspire One

Just by looking at the photo (above), you will agree with me that this netbook is a certified head-turner. But, I didn't pick Aspire One for the cuteness-factor alone. Its all essential tech specs of 1.6 GHz Intel Atom processor, 8 GB SSD or 120 GB HDD, up to 1 GB RAM, 8.9" display (1024x600 LED-backlit TFT LCD), 3 USB ports, Wireless LAN, and up to 6 hours of (reported) battery life are more than enough for my needs. It also has a built-in flash memory card reader, a 0.3 Megapixel Webcam, and of course, it can be pre-installed with a Fedora-based Linpus Linux.

Asus Eee 1000 Series

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