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Red Hat Infrastructure report

Filed under
Linux
Security

Last week we discovered that some Fedora servers were illegally
accessed. The intrusion into the servers was quickly discovered, and the
servers were taken offline.

Security specialists and administrators have been working since then to
analyze the intrusion and the extent of the compromise as well as
reinstall Fedora systems. We are using the requisite outages as an
opportunity to do other upgrades for the sake of functionality as well
as security. Work is ongoing, so please be patient. Anyone with
pertinent information relating to this event is asked to contact
fedora-legal redhat com

One of the compromised Fedora servers was a system used for signing
Fedora packages. However, based on our efforts, we have high confidence
that the intruder was not able to capture the passphrase used to secure
the Fedora package signing key. Based on our review to date, the
passphrase was not used during the time of the intrusion on the system
and the passphrase is not stored on any of the Fedora servers.

While there is no definitive evidence that the Fedora key has been
compromised, because Fedora packages are distributed via multiple
third-party mirrors and repositories, we have decided to convert to new
Fedora signing keys. This may require affirmative steps from every
Fedora system owner or administrator. We will widely and clearly
communicate any such steps to help users when available.

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